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THE

GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,

AND

HISTORICAL CHRONICLE.

From JULY TO DECEMBER, 1828.

VOLUME XCVIII.

(BEING THE TWENTY-FIRST OF A NEW SERIES.)

PART THE SECOND.

PRODESSE & DELECTARE.

E PLURIBUS UNUM.

LIBRARD
Leland Stauford, Jr.)

UNIVERSITY
By SYLVANOS URBAN, GENT.

London :

PRINTED BY J. B. NICHOLS AND SON, 25, PARLIAMENT STREET;

WHERE LETTERS ARE PARTICULARLY REQUESTED TO BE SENT, POST-PAID;

AND SOLD BY JOHN HARRIS,
AT THE CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHI YARD, LUDGATE STREET ;

AND BY PERTIES AND BESSER, HAMBURGH.

1823.

THE IRISH CATHOLIC PETITION, FOR 1829.

GREAT GEORGE, we pray that you may own To join the foes of Mother Church,
The Pope a partner

of
your
throne;

And let their old friends in the lurch;
Let him make laws for your communion, So with your minions you may bring them,
And oh repeal the Act of Union!

For the Pope's legate would unking them. Then shall ten kings in Erin's Isle

Let Enniskillen be pull'd down, On Rome's fair Church complacent snile, That obstinate, unruly town, And, sever'd from your British nation, Which crack'd the rim of James's crown; We shall obtain Emancipation.

Fernanagh might assuage the ire No more shall Bible-men annoy us ;

Of all the race of Lord Maguire. Police or Peelers grim destroy us.

O'Dogherty, or Con. O'Donnel Italian legates then shall guide us ;

Must have the kingdoin of 'Circounel; And with their inanuals provide us.

No part of it shall court finesse While Peter's pence from each man's dwell- Retain for the fair Marchioness; ing,

Of it Sir Albert's sword bereav'd us, And Priests indulgences all selling,

We hate the breed that once enslav'd us; The Church's gold bags will be swelling. Longford give back to Prince O'Farrel, Elizabeth and Scottish James

And Tipperary to O'Carrol.
Gave cause for some of these our claims; To save Kent, Cumberland, and York,
Cromwell caus'd cruel desolation,

To
sage

Tom Gould surrender Cork.
And William shameful confiscation.

De Courcy, Mahony, and Barry,
The lands then lost must soon return Out of the country you may carry.
To those who for their birth-right burn. If blood and treasure you would spare,
Our own true Church, Saint Patrick's glory, Purcel O'Gorman must have Clare.
Renown'd in old Milesian story,

Give Galway to French, Lynch, or Daly, In foul subjection can't remain,

Mayo belongs to great O'Maley; But must be mistress here again.

But he has forfeited th' entail Her lands and tithes must be restor'd, That came to him from Granu-wale. Her Host bow'd down to and ador'd; Let Esmonde's Knight o'er Wexford rule, Her Abbeys all must be rebuilt,

Give Wicklow, Arklow, and Kilcool, And sanctuaries be for guilt ;

To Byrne, Cavanagh, or Toole. And Monks or Nuns each holy place

Esmonde's deserve their whole estate, In splendid hoods and habits grace.

For one life lost in Ninety-eight. Askeaton's cloisters, wide and fair,

From Toole's old stock St. Laurence sprung, With marble we'll once more repair ; Whose praise is in our masses sung. And with new gold again emboss

Westineath resign to Lough lio Tracy, 'The shrine of ancient Holy Cross.

Green-Castle grant to Hugh de Lacy, Send all your heretics away,

As for the County call'd your own,
Let done of them among us stay;

Ortelius points out O'Maloue.
Sweep them from Dublin, Cork, and Kerry, And of your Majesty's great bounty,
But first of all from Londonderry.

Give Paddy Murphy the Queen's County.
No more let 'Prentice Boys deride us, O'Conor Don of Ballynagare
Where Walker's Williamites defied us. Would take Roscommon for his share.
And let M'Closky and O'Kane

For Sligo Shiel would cease from riot, Their territories there regain.

Doyle too for Carlow might be quiet ; As for O'Neill we all disown him,

Playful at last that grumbling Bruin
If he were king we would dethrone him. Would smile to see your Church's ruin.
O'Brien left us long ago,

Staunton, the Register of Rome,
And still remains his Country's foc ; For Kingstown geutle might become ;
Unlike his ancestor so true,

O'Connell for the realm of Kerry,
The mighty monarch King Boru:

Now rude and sad, grow mild and merry; He was the “ Catholic crusader,"

Conway for Kells give up the Post, Who would repel the proud invader.

And of the millions cease to boast. Mac Donnel, Sheridan, and Terill

Give Lawless Cavan or Kilcock, Forsook us in the day of peril.

And all the rest to Captain Rock. Stackpole, Moloney, and 'O'Mara

Then from our claims the land may rest, Have gone with Kirwan and O'Hara, And England be supremely blest. Magetligan.

JOHN GRAHAM. 151821

PREFACE.

Of all the great questions which have agitated the public mind, during the long period of our literary existence, none has perhaps exceeded in national importance the subject of Catholic Emancipation The agitation arising from the continued discussion of it has progressively increased; and the past year has been more pregnant with events of awful importance than any of its predecessors. Lawless gangs of papistical demagogues, stimulated by priestly influence, have at times threatened the annihilation of all social order, and even set the Constitution and Laws of the Realm at defiance. This menacing attitude has called forth a counter spirit on the part of the Protestant community, which has been pobly supported by the highest and most influential personages of the land. Brunswick Clubs have been called into existence by existing circumstances ; and they have, we believe, in some measure, tended to check the dangerous spirit which had so audaciously manifested itself. Of late the Catholics have been divided into two parties; one dominates over Ireland, and endeavours to effect its objects by menace and intimidation; the other exists in England, and with more duplicity and less candour wishes to attain its ends by hypocrisy and misrepresentation. Thus the Irish Catholic Association treat with indignant scorn every idea of emancipation short of political ascendancy; by which Popery is to be absolute and uncontrouled in these kingdoms, and at the same time possess the power of legislating for our Protestant Establishment! The British Catholic Association assume more moderation in their views, and pretend that they would be satisfied with emancipation qualified by securities; but how long they would be satisfied, after the attainment of their ostensible objects, they have not condescended to inform us. In a late meeting, however, of the Irish Association (see p. 459), Mr. O'Connell denounced those members of the English Association who had evinced a disposition to entertain the question of securities. He was of opinion that the Irish Catholics must make arrangements to separate themselves from the English Association, and they would get up an honest Association in England." We perfectly coincide with Mr. O'Connell that there has been much dishonesty of late in the avowed sentiments of the British Catholics ; for they have taken up fresh positions, and insidiously pretend that the spirit of their infallible and immutable Church has been considerably mollified of late years; that there is not the same hostility against heresy; and that consequently there can be no possible danger in admitting Catholics to the head and guidance of a Protestant State and a Protestant Church. But it is our solemn opinion, and we believe all history will attest the truth of it, that the Papal monster still tankles with the same envenomed hostility against Protestantism, as when in the plenitude of its power. No further back than in the year 1803, for instance, the instructions of Pius VII. to his Nuncio at Venice were, that “it was a fundamental principle of the canon law that the subjects of a Prince who is avowedly a heretic, remain discharged of all obligations of homage, allegiance, and obedience towards him." Surely no compromise can be made on the part of a Protestant Government with a Church main. taining principles so hostile to our political existence, and to all social order. In fact, there is no popular fallacy more vehemently maintained, or that has received more general credence, than that the spirit of Popery is now exceedingly modified, if not altogether harmless, and

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