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arguments to fortify a christian against
the fear of death

233

340

400

death unites us to the family above 319
contemplations on death
a striking thought to dying sinners on
the word perhaps
Decrees connected with means
i 302
Deists, Dr. Samuel Clarke divides them into
four classes
i pref. 20
Deism, is incumbered with insuperable diffi-
culties
ii 358
Democracy, defects of that form of govern-
i 391
Demosthenes, examples of his eloquence i 242
Depravity of men
i 105
Descartes contributed to remove the absurd
notions of God, imbibed by the
schoolmen

ment

i 56
Despair and gloom, ten arguments against it
i 98

Doctrines of Christ-six: Heb. vi.

trates the conjecture of some Jews, that
Christ called for Elias
ii 167

Errors, speculative, may be injurious to the
soul

i 375

Essenes, it is highly probable that many of
them embraced Christianity, (see
Eusebius)
i 245
i 87

Eternity, efforts to calculate its length
Evidence of object, and evidence of testimony
defined
ii 174
Exile recommended in a bloody persecution

ii 288
Existence, the consciousness of it proved after
the Cartesian manner
i 50
Exordiums, our author's method in that point
was singularly striking i 186.
312-ii 42
miracles and prodigies gave the
first preachers a superiority over
us in point of exordiums ii 195
an exordium of negatives i 321
an exordium on alms
413
an exordium of prodigies; an in-
comparable one on the oblation
of Christ
165
ii 3 Experience is the best of preachers, &c. ii 260

F

despair from the death of the head of
a house

ii 337
Devil, has malice and wiles
ii 226
Difficulties of succeeding a great character

ii 344
i 41

abstruse doctrines are difficult to
weigh

difficulties of attending to abstract
doctrines

Drusilla, her character

i 62
ii 8. 294
Duelling attended with bad consequences ii 39 Faith, the circumstances, the efforts, the evi-
Dupont, (Professor) his life
ii 127
dences, and the sacrifices which ac-
company it
i 160
299

129

ib.

his essay on David's feigned epilep-
sy before Achish
Duties, the smaller duties of religion i 365
attention to them, contribute to a ten-
der conscience
366
to reconversion after great relapses
367

the just shall live by it
justifying faith described
the faith inculcated by the Arians and
by many of the Romanists, refuted
the distinction between being justified
by faith, and the having only a de-
sire to be justified, illustrated in five
respects

300

they contribute by their frequency, for
what is wanting in their impor-

368

301
304

tance
they afford sometimes stronger marks
of real love to God, than greater
duties

faith without works is dead
inattention to providence, a cause of
the weakness of our faith

faith or belief described
obscure faith defined

349
372
ii 174

an act of faith in regard to retrospec-
tive and to future objects
180
Family of Christ, five characters of it ii 316
Fast, a striking method of notifying one

325

ib.
duties of professional men ii 31
duties of ministers when alone with
dying people
32

duties of preaching and hearing are
connected

62
the high duties of princes and magis-
trates

343

Dying people often fall into six mistakes ii 32

Elijah, his ascension strikingly illustrated

ii 362

E
Ecclesiastes, a caution against misquoting that
book
ii 65
Ecclesiastical domination attended with six
evils
i 167
Earnest of the Holy Spirit
i 334
Eating sour grapes, a proverbial

ii 413

expression
Edicts, a catalogue of, against the Protestants
ii 366
Education of children, a grand duty, &c. ii 23
seven maxims of a good education 27
bad education must be reformed 76
Ejaculations for divine aid in preaching i 236
Eleazer, his martyrdom
ii 281
Eli, Eli, lama sabacthani: our author illus-

ed

Fasting enforced from the plague, the mur-
rain of the cattle, and the loss of
trade
347
Fatalism, its manner of comforting the afflict-
i 229
Fear, as applied to God, has three accepta-
tions: terror, worship, and homage,
arising from a conviction that God
possesses every thing to make us hap-
py or miserable
i 18
arguments against the fear of man 119
Feast of the fainting
ii 419
Felix, his character
ii 293

he is considered as a heathen, a prince,
an avaricious and a voluptuous man

296

his procrastination is imitated by sin-
298
Festivals
ii 371

ners

vi

Figurative language, specimens of its beauty

i 423. ii 94
and force
the figurative style of Isaiah xi.
i 64
it is inadequate to express divine
things

53
379

specimen of its powers

Fire, it burns the wood, hay and stubble, and
purifies the gold and silver

i 94
the frailties of nature distinguished from
i 374
wilful sins

G

Gaming, the sin of
Genealogy of Christ

Games in Greece and Rome, five remarks on
ii 10
them
ii 6. i 402
ii 314
a solution of the difficulties of it,
315
apparently correct
of the persons nearly related to
ib.
the Lord
Genius, tradesinen often ruined by a superior
i 74
intellect
Glory of the latter day, or prosperity of the
Messiah's kingdom

i 182
i51
52

his supreme felicity

56

God realized in a fine exordium
58 &c. i 58
his omnipresence
proved by his boundless knowledge, his
general influence, and his universal
direction

God's eternity

God's ubiquity exemplified

ib.
God is a spirit and matter, however modi-
fied, can never resemble him

57

God protects us by his presence, he invigo-
rates virtue, and awes vice

has afforded, and by the rewards he
has conferred

God's

90
95. 108
the goodness of God defined
anger and wrath, are ideas borrowed
from men; the animal spirits boil
with rage, but anger with God is
knowing how to proportion punish-
ment to crime; this idea is striking-
100
ly exemplified in six instances
God is one in excellence, which is the source
of all his perfections; they all act in uni-
son, exemplified in five points 208
God's love to sinners

102

the time of God's justice must

60

61

the grandeur of God justifies mysteries,
and supersedes objects

62

it is an argument to repentance, to hu-
mility, to confidence, and to vigi-
lance

63

God's essence is independent in its cause
universal in its extent
it comprises every excellence

the terrors of God's vengeance
God's long-suffering abused four ways

it is a grand subject for enforcing
charges of sanctity on an audience

64

the sublime description of God in the
xith of Isaiah is to discountenance
idolatry

God, the reverence due to him

65
66
ib.
ib.

235

111

to David, Manasseh, Peter, & Saul of
Tarsus

115
122

in regard to his regal sovereignty and im-
mortality, he is the object of our fear

124

125

the grandeur of God in his works, awes
ib.
the tyrants of the church
the whole creation fights for God at
his pleasure
God, the object of praise; to join with angels
in this duty, we must have the senti-
ments of angels
character of God's mercy ii 47. 255. 325
the depths of God

127

72

of nature

it is unchangeable in its operations
while variation is the character of the
creature

67

it is eternal in duration

ib.

ib.

the grandeur of God conspicuous in
the immensity of his works
God, great in counsel, and mighty in ope-
ration; matter and spirit are alike
known to him

73

85

84

God's holiness proved from nature, from an-
gels, and the human heart
God's holiness is our model
God's compassion must be in unison with the
spirituality of his essence, for a hurt-
ful pity is weakness

87

he alone capable of perfect compas-

come

109

sion

89

it is exemplified to sinful men, by the
victim he has substituted, by the pa-
tience he has exercised, by the sins
he has pardoned, by the friendship he

74

of providence

75

of revelation

76

God is present in religious assemblies ii 193
God's long-suffering has limits, as appears
from public catastrophes, from obdu-
266
rate sinners, from dying men
ii 404
perfections of
ii 94
silver, &c. are figuratively sound doc-
trine
Gospel, our author often preached on the gos-
pel for the day, which accounts for
i 99
his long texts
the gospel reveals the perfections of
God

Gold,

327
ii 160
its doctrines are infallible
the great sin of not profiting by its su
333, &c.
perior light
395
invites all men to repentance
grace requires a preparation of heart
ii 142, &c.
181
there are degrees of grace
the folly of sinning that grace may
255, &c.
a day of grace, or time of visitation
allowed to nations and to individu-
366
als
254
the sufficiency of grace
the day of grace, or time of visitation

abound

301

the doctrines of grace admirably stat
ed in six propositions 396, &c.
five cautionary maxims against mis-
stating the doctrine
gratitude required for mercies

395
385

H
ii 245
Habits, vicious ones, may be renounced when
old, in five cases
Hearers recommended to review their life i 116

Hearers, some may be moved with tenderness, Hobbes and Machiavel, a word to their disci-
vii
but others require terror

86

plain dealing with negligent hearers

70

Holland, very wicked men in it
ples
ii 350
six cautions to that nation
i 333
385
augurs of its prosperity from its tears
a sketch of its vices ii 351. i 110. 221
389
three sources of hope for Holland,
&c.
its high and mighty lords called to
ii 353
repentance

383
395

the hearer who wantonly sins against
light, is thought to equal the Athe-
ist in guilt

111

a repartee with hearers on the word
fear
ii 251
they are reminded of righteousness,
temperance, and a judgment to

299

come

Heaven, God will there communicate ideas or
knowledge
i 329

love

330

virtue

ib.

felicity

331

these four communications are con-
nected together; we cannot in hea-
ven help possessing rectitude of
thought and a propensity to love
and imitate God
a resemblance of God being the es-
332
sence of heaven, it is Satan's plan
to render man unlike his God
scholastic disputation whether we
ib.
shall know one another in heaven
thoughts of heaven diminish the an-
ii 25
guish of the cross

153

the joys of meeting Christ and saints
in heaven

the third heaven of which St. Paul
155
speaks
201

ib.

208

203

why its happiness is unutterable
the blessed in heaven possess superior
knowledge
they are prompted by inclinations the
most noble and refined
they possess all sensible pleasure in
heaven
the church sighing for more of hea-
206
foretastes of heaven felt on earth 313
209, &c.
the delightful society of heaven, &c.
Hebrew Christians, the scope and design of
319
St. Paul's epistle to them
their situation stated
ii 271
Hell, there is no philosophy against its fear
286

ven

i 336

ib.

the eternity of hell torments
this doctrine confirmed and Origen re-
futed
four farther arguments on this subject
337

338

the torments of hell consist in the priva-
tion of celestial happiness

340
ib.

in painful sensations

in remorse of conscience

341

in the horrors of society
in the increase of sin

ib.

ib.

there are degrees of torment in hell, but
the mildest are intolerable
the cries of its inhabitants
ii 100
Hero, he that ruleth his spirit is greater than
340
he that taketh a city, in four respects
i 427. ii 384
Herod Antipas, his conduct to Jesus
Herodotus, his account of Pharoah Necho's
i 174
ii 364
(see our Prideaux.)

expedition

Holiness, the word has many acceptations
religious disputes in Holland

i 79

it is virtue, rectitude, order, or a con-
formity to God

80

it often means justice
or fitness

81

ib.

i 94

Huett, his eccentricity
Humanity to the brute creation enforced by
Jewish and Pagan laws
Hypocrisy rebuked
Humility, a cause of gratitude
ii 372

i 130

i 364

the hypocrite described

i-363

I

Ideas, the imperfection of them
change of

Idolatry, best refuted by irony
Idleness, mischiefs arising from it

it disgraces man made in the
of God
Image of God in man
its remains

image
i 69
ii 29
i 332
83

Inferences from the being of God

Imagination, its magnifying powers over the
Inferences, Heb. ii. 1, 3. A striking inference
imaginative
ii 75
from the Godhead of Christ
i 280
i 94
a caution against wrong inferences
from St. Peter's sin
the multitude ought not to be our
162
rule
Infidelity affects an air of superiority
171
its dogmas revolt our moral feel-
ii 52
ings
it followed the spirit of blind credu-
ib.
lity
186
359

it has insuperable difficulties
Iniquities of the fathers visited on the children;
the nature of that economy i 107
Intercession of Christ; its omnipotency, &c.
Intemperance
ii 295

ii 163

ii 169

i 150

ii 35

ii 26

ii 395

Isaac, a type of Christ
Isaiah, his mission to Ahaz

Isis, an Egyptian god alluded to
Ishmael preserved by providence
Invocation adapted to the subject

i 329

ii 401

i 371

J
James, (St.) the paradoxes or high morality
Jeremiah, the sale of his land a proof of pro-
of his epistle
i 350
phecy
his boldness at fourteen years of age
i 71
159

his severe mission to his country ii

187

347

Jeremiah, his complaints against them
Jews, their hardness and opprobrium inferred
from the various methods Jesus Christ
adopted for their conversion i 164
we should have a little patience with
their prejudices
183

the Jews safer guides to prophecy than
some Christians,-(perhaps the author
alludes to Grotius, who affected an
unpardonable singularity in expo-
sitions of the prophecies,)
could they be persuaded though one
rose from the dead

187

ib.

202 Knowledge, the imperfection of it, no proof
of the non-existence of God, and
of divine truth
i 94
defects of human knowledge
ii 203

five reasons why our knowledge
is circumscribed
360
man cannot know as God knows,
which is an adequate apology
for the mysteries of faith 362
L

two answers

their fair promises before Sinai were

transient

ii 82

six of their calamities deplored by
Ezekiel

365

character of their apostate kings 367
the Jews perished as the Galileans

381
the calamities of the Jews and those
of Europe, compared
ib.
John and Mary, address of Christ to ii 417
Judas went to his own place
ii 109
it were better that he had not been born,
in four arguments
ib.
the circumstances in which he sinned
113
the pleas with which he covered his
ib.
the confession extorted by his conscience
114
Judgment, the day of
i 53
54

crime

power of the judge

325

a future judgment is inferred from
disorders of society, from the
power of conscience, and from
revelation
322
we shall be judged according to the
dispensations under which we
lived
these are light, proportion or ta-
lents
ib.
and mercy
326, &c.
Judgments (national,) the erroneous and the
just light in which they should be
viewed
ii 378, &c.
four erroneous dispositions in which
they are viewed
ib. &c.
God is not only the author of all
judgments, but he determines
their ends in three respects 379
a provisional or particular judg-
ment on every man as soon as
his soul leaves the body i 321
the judgment or opinion must
often be suspended ii 76
Justification, Anselm's mode of expressing on
that subject
i 301
Justification by faith
299

his weapons, his courtiers, his re-
wards
i 180
his kingdom not being of this world, de-
monstrates the authenticity of his
mission

184

a search for the subjects of the Mes-
siah's kingdom among the Jews, in
Rome, in Protestant countries 185
in this point the faith and practice of
Christians are at dissonance 186
of heaven, meaning of the expression
ii 401

K

Keduscha Kadytis, or holy, the name of Jeru-
salem in many of the ori-
ental languages ii 364
King, the term defined
ii 18
responsible
343

The kingdom of Christ is not of this
world, as is apparent from his design,
his maxims, his marvellous works,

Latitudinarianism, or Deism

ii 359
Law, offending in one point, &c. refers to ca-
pital offences, not to daily frailties, mo-
mentary faults and involuntary pas-
sions
i 352
it refers to wilful and presumptuous sins,
which virtually sap the foundation of
the whole law in three respects 354
the law requires us to consider God as a
sovereign, a legislator, and a father ib.
the excellent design of God's law in
four arguments
381
Lawyers, their method of false pleading ii 73
Learning and knowledge should be acquired
by Christians
Legends, a specimen of them
Lent, apparently observed with great reve-
rence by the author's hearers i 187
this festival is strongly recommended
ii 164

i 219

ii 140

persons

i 52
ib.
i 270

Levitical law supported by three classes of
ii 219
Libertines, their objections against revelation
refuted in four arguments
Liberty, (Christian) described
Liberty described in five points: in the power
of suspending the judgment, in having
the will in unison with the under-
standing, the conscience superior to
the control of the senses, superior
to our condition in life
i 268
Liberty is incompatible with sin
269
Life, arguments on its shortness and uncer-
tainty
ii 215

the life of men divided into six

periods
214

216

this life is a season of probation assign-
ed for making our choice
215
the grand object of life is to prepare for
eternity
sinners should be grateful for the re-
prieve of life
ib.
life well spent affords satisfaction to old
age
i 289
an idle life, however exempt from gross-
er crime, is incompatible with a state
of salvation
371

ix

Life, the viscissitudes of life

reflections on it

63

ij 59 | Marlborough, (Duke of) his victory over
we should value the good things of life ib. Martyrs, a fine apostrophe to them
Marshal Villars
some men hate life, through a disposi-
ii 89
tion of melancholy
the Jews believed in their resurrec
i 123
tion
the moral martyrs are sometimes ac-
158
cused of rebellion
ii 19
21

65

through a principle of misanthropy 66
through discontent and disgust
and through an excessive fondness of
ib.
life
ib.

they have a fourfold reward
arguments of support to martyrs 13
the fear of martyrdom
Marvellous, the, a caution against it
Mary, the mother of Christ
Maxims of the world
Materiality of the soul refuted

320
ii 421
ii 182

i 261

ii 31

Mediator, Christ in this office is one with God
in three respects
Merchants, apprised of a heavenly treasure
ii 157
Messiah, a comfort to the church under the
ii 217
idea of the Jewish captivity
Metaphysical mode of reasoning, concerning
i 76
Ministers or casuists, cautioned ii 50. 71. 107
spirit and matter
i 58
humility must be their character 93
St. Paul divides them into three
classes
ib.

Ministers should be distinguished by love 151
their glory in the day of the Lord 97
an address to them
their duty when attending profli-

217

gate men in their last moments

rectitude and delicacy of conscience pro-
mote disgust of life

Live, how shall we, the expression beautifully
69
applied

Louis XIV, a cruel, superstitious and enthu-
ii 417
his monarchy obviously alluded
i 389

siastic man

to

391

his secret policy against the
neighbouring states
his glory, and the humiliation of
395
his pride
Love, the energy of the love of Christ i 291
ii 108
the sinner is exhorted to enkindle his
heart with love
effects of Christ's love on the heart 294
292
his love is an inexhaustible source of

consolation in all the distresses of
life, and in the agonies of death 295
it is a source of universal obedience ib.
Love to God described
371

M

Machiavelian politics

i 396. ii 350
portrait of the infidel who shall
presume to govern a king-
dom on those principles 367

ii 217
ii 355

Magistrates addressed
Mahomet, character of that monster
Maimonides, this learned Rabbi agrees with
St. Paul, Rom. xii. 2. that God
requires our persons, not our
sacrifices
Malachi, character of the people to whom he
i 288
preached
and the character of the priests 196
ii 192
Malebranche, his admirable exposition of the
passions
Man, in the simplicity of youth admires the
ii 73
perfections of God, and the theory of
religion
man is born with a propensity to vice
ii 278

281

285

the dangers to which a well disposed
man is exposed to in public life
his faculty of thinking, loving and feel-
ing, demonstrate the limits of his
mind
wants of
360
Mankind, the wisdom of God in the diversity
402
of their conditions
i 252
they are all equal in natural pow-
ers and infirmities
in privilege, and claims on God
and providence
254
in the designations of the Creator
according to their endowments

253

in their doom to suffer and die 256
255
our lot in life, and our faculties
prove our designation for another
world
ii 61

249

woe, woe to the faithless ministry
Ministers must strike at vice without respect
259
to persons

295

Ministry, the little success of Christ's ministry
accounted for by five considera-
tions
i 166
the christian ministry excites digni-
fied enemies
attendance on it must make us
177
either better or worse
386
it was greatly abused by the Jews
a striking transition from preaching
ii 8
the most tremendous terrors, to
the ministry of consolation ii 250
an apology for the ministry of ter
ror to certain characters
were performed in the most public
place and before the most compe
tent judges
i 197
the folly of asking miracles while we
Miser, a, his reflections at a funeral but tran-
live in sin
sient
i 208
ii 7

224

209

Molinists, an opinion of theirs censured
Morality, its principle, the love of God is
Montausier (Mons. de) his confession
i 405
always the same, its variations
therefore are simply the effect of
superior light
i 324
the nature, obligations and motives
of morality
it has five characters: it is clearly
i pref. xxxv
revealed
18

it is distinguished by dignity of
principle

by equity of claims

19
ib.

by being within our reach

21

and by the power of its motives 22

Miracles

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