Israel in Exile: Jewish Writing and the Desert

الغلاف الأمامي
University of Illinois Press, 01‏/10‏/2010 - 232 من الصفحات
Israel in Exile is a bold exploration of how the ancient desert of Exodus and Numbers, as archetypal site of human liberation, forms a template for modern political identities, radical skepticism, and questioning of official narratives of the nation that appear in the works of contemporary Israeli authors including David Grossman, Shulamith Hareven, and Amos Oz, as well as diasporic writers such as Edmund Jabès and Simone Zelitch.

In contrast to other ethnic and national representations, Jewish writers since antiquity have not constructed a neat antithesis between the desert and the city or nation; rather, the desert becomes a symbol against which the values of the city or nation can be tested, measured, and sometimes found wanting. This book examines how the ethical tension between the clashing Mosaic and Davidic paradigms of the desert still reverberate in secular Jewish literature and produce fascinating literary rewards. Omer-Sherman ultimately argues that the ancient encounter with the desert acquires a renewed urgency in response to the crisis brought about by national identities and territorial conflicts.
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

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المحتوى

Poetics and Politics
1
2 Justice and the OldNew Jewish Nation
29
3 Desert Space and National Consciousness
60
4 Immobilized Rebels on the Outskirts of the Promised Land
96
5 Sinai of the Diasporic Imagination
126
6 Wilderness as Experience and Metaphor
159
Notes
177
Works Cited
193
Index
203
حقوق النشر

طبعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات

عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

نبذة عن المؤلف (2010)

Ranen Omer-Sherman spent thirteen years in the Arava desert as a kibbutznik, guide, and ranger. He is an assistant professor of English at the University of Miami, and the author of Diaspora and Zionism in Jewish American Literature.

معلومات المراجع