An Inquiry Into the Importance of the Militia to a Free Commonwealth: In a Letter from William H. Sumner ... to John Adams, Late President of the United States; with His Answer, المجلد 40،العدد 1

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Cummings and Hilliard, 1823 - 70 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 63 - THAT a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural and safe defence of a free State; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided, as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases, the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
الصفحة 70 - I see with pride and delight that you come forward with such patriotism, talents and patience of thinking and inquiry, in the service of your country. I long to see your letter in print. Whenever the militia comes to an end, or is despised or neglected, I shall consider this union dissolved, and the liberties of North America lost forever.
الصفحة 18 - ... militia assigned to them. The militia are well organized, and would undoubtedly prefer to defend their firesides in company with their friends under their own officers, rather than to be marched to some distant place, while strangers might be introduced to take their places at home.
الصفحة 18 - ... assigned to them. The militia are well organized, and would, undoubtedly, prefer to defend their firesides, in company with their friends, under their own officers, rather than be marched to some distant place, while strangers might be introduced to take their places at home. " In Boston the militia is well disciplined, and could be mustered in an hour, upon any signal of an approaching enemy ; and in six hours the neighbouring towns would pour in a greater force than an invading enemy will bring...
الصفحة 69 - These American states have owed their existence to the militia for more than two hundred years. Neither schools, nor colleges, nor town meetings have been more essential to the formation and character of the nation than the militia.
الصفحة 17 - The prolongation of the war, for a single camVOL. ii. n a major ; two of the companies will be stationed at Eastport, and one company at Robinston> until the president shall otherwise direct. I have no intention officially to interfere in the measures of the general government, but if the president was fully acquainted with the situation of this state, I think he would have no wish to call our militia into service in the manner proposed by general Dearborn. it is well known that the enemy will find...
الصفحة 21 - Upon that occasion a company of artillery, and two of light infantry, composed of persons, who, at the lime they were notified, were engaged in their private pursuits, prepared with three days provisions, and completely armed, uniformed and equipped, travelled through miry roads, a distance of eighteen miles, from Hallowell, Augusta, and Gardner, and reported themselves in less than twentyfour hours from the time the videt was despatched with the order for their assembling. This was not a solitary...
الصفحة 60 - ... property, will abandon the chief mean of its security. The value of our militia, as an example should be estimated by the superiority of its discipline. If what was said of the Massachusetts militia during the war, by one, who had seen that of the other states, was true," that its spirit and drill was as much superior to that of most other parts of the country, as the value of its specie currency was above their unredeemed bills," our pride, as well as interest should be engaged in supporting...
الصفحة 17 - ... the secretary of war, justly set forth the advantages resulting from the location and character of our population and force; he says, "If the president was fully acquainted with the situation of this state, I think he would have no wish to call our militia into service, in the manner proposed. ' " Predatory incursions are not likely to take place in this state, for at every point, except Passamaquoddy, which can present an object to those incursions, the people are too numerous to be attacked...
الصفحة 5 - ... silence, or, who exercised jeering, fighting or quarrelling, should be adjudged guilty of a misdemeanor, and punished according to the order of military discipline, and the nature of the offence. " That every man who should be absent, except on good occasion, or the hand of God was upon him, should pay for his default; and, if he refused, he should be distrained, and put out of the list.

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