Travels in the United States of America and Canada: Containing Some Account of Their Scientific Institutions, and a Few Notices of the Geology and Mineralogy of Those Countries. To which is Added, an Essay on the Natural Boundaries of Empires

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1833 - 455 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 339 - Pisone consulibus, regni cupiditate inductus, conjurationem nobilitatis fecit, et civitati persuasit ut de finibus suis cum omnibus copiis exirent : perfacile esse, cum virtute omnibus praestarent, totius Galliae imperio podrí. 2Id hoc facilius eis persuasit, quod undique loci natura Helvetii continentur : una ex parte flumine Rheno latissimo atque altissimo, qui agrum Helvetium a Germanis dividit ; altera ex parte monte Jura altissimo, qui est inter Sequanos et Helvetios ; tertia lacu Lemanno et...
الصفحة 407 - But where to find that happiest spot below Who can direct, when all pretend to know ? The shuddering tenant of the frigid zone Boldly proclaims that happiest spot his own ; Extols the treasures of his stormy seas, And his long nights of revelry and ease : The naked Negro, panting at the line, Boasts of his golden sands and palmy wine, Basks in the glare, or stems the tepid wave, And thanks his gods for all the good they gave.
الصفحة 306 - Delightful Wyoming ! beneath thy skies, The happy shepherd swains had nought to do, But feed their flocks on green declivities, Or skim perchance thy lake with light canoe...
الصفحة 388 - Ocean to the borders of Egypt, bounded on the north by the Mediterranean, on the south by the chain of Mount Atlas, is another instance of a country whose destiny is fixed by its shape. It could not be united under one government, except by a superior naval power, situated in those seas.
الصفحة 397 - This demarcation was a line drawn from the North to the South * Pole, at a distance of one hundred leagues west of the Azores and Cape Verde islands.
الصفحة 275 - ... extensive marsh, partially rescued from the tide by an embankment. This marsh was formerly covered by a forest of cedars, extremely valuable from the size of the timber, and their vicinity to New York. By one of those fires, which often arise in the woods of America, the forest was entirely destroyed, and only the blackened stumps of the trees remain. The conflagration extended over several square miles, and the sight of the forest in flames was described, by those who saw it from the neighboring...
الصفحة 104 - Heaven's ethereal bow Spans with bright arch the glittering hills below, Why to yon mountain turns the musing eye, Whose sunbright summit mingles with the sky ? Why do those cliffs of shadowy tint appear More sweet than all the landscape smiling near ?'Tis distance lends enchantment to the view, And robes the mountain in its azure hue.
الصفحة 235 - A planter informed me it was good policy to employ oxen on a plantation, because the slaves could not ride them on these excursions. Almost every night parties take place among the slaves on the plantations ; they assemble from a great distance, and have a number of amusements. These vary in different States : the slaves follow the example set by their masters. In Maryland dancing is fashionable ; the slaves frequently dance all night. In Virginia musical parties are more frequent ; every negro is...
الصفحة 313 - ... thirty years of age, he was minister of a small country church, with a salary of twenty-five pounds sterling a year; a hesitation in his speech which prevented his being a popular preacher; and his sentiments of religious truth were opposed. He had to contend with disease, poverty, and persecution. What had he to support him in this forlorn and desolate situation ? His dependence was upon God, whom his enemies said he contemned ; and that love of science which often renders its votary superior...
الصفحة 361 - ... may be accounted for in the following manner: the sun never shines equally on the two sides of a mountain at the same time. A native of the north looks upon the mountain, and beholds it enveloped in shade. A native of the south beholds it resplendent with light, and all the landscape enlivened with the rays of the sun. How can two individuals who see the same object in such different points of view, ever think alike on any subject ? Again. The temperature of the air is always different. A native...

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