صور الصفحة
PDF
النشر الإلكتروني
[graphic]

COURSE OF LATIN STUDIES:

OR

CLASSICAL SELECTIONS;

WITH NOTES TO FACILITATE THE PROGRESS OF
LEARNERS.

Published in a cheap, correct, and improved form.

COMPRISED IN FIVE PARTS.

Second Edition with Notes.

For the Use of American Schools.

Printed for William P. Farrand and Co.; B. B. Hopkins and Co. Phi
ladelphia; Ph. H. Nicklin and Co. Baltimore; Farrand, Mal-
lory and Co. Boston; D. Farrand and Green, Albany; Ly-
man, Mallory and Co. Portland; R. Patterson and Co.

Pittsburgh.
Fry and Kammerer, Printers.

1810.

MARYARD COLLEGE LIBRARY
GIFT OF THE

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Zoney sq

DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, to wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the first day of June, in the thirty fourth year of the Independence of the United States of America, A. D. 1810.

******

William P. Farrand, of the said district, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

"Farrand's Course of Latin Studies: or Classical Selections; with notes to facilitate the progress of learners. Published in a cheap, correct, and improved form; comprised in five parts. Second edition with notes. For the use of American schools."

***

Seal.

In conformity to the act of the congress of the United States, entitled "An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned." And also to the act, entitled "An act supplementary to an act, entitled "An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned," and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

D. CALDWELL,
Clerk of the District of Pennsylvania.

Doctor Clark's Preface

TO CORDERIUS.

THE advantage of literal translations of the easier authors in the Latin tongue, for the use of beginners, is so very great, and withal so very obvious, that it will appear, I doubt not, to others, upon a little reflection, as it does to me, a wonder, that our schools should remain so long unfurnished with any helps of this kind. How it comes about, that those concerned in the education of youth should be so much overseen in so plain a matter, I know not. The generality at least have appeared so little sensible of any thing amiss in the vulgar method of teaching, in this respect, that they have gone hitherto contentedly forward, in a very rugged, uneven, painful way, without so much as suspecting it capable of being rendered more easy and delightful. The little progress made in our schools the first four or five years which boys spend there, is really amazing, and would naturally tempt a person of any reflection to suspect there must be some very great flaw, some notorious mismanagement in the common method of proceeding. How else comes it to pass that the French tongue is attained to a good degree of perfection in half the time which is spent in the Latin tongue to no manner of purpose? I grant, indeed, the way of expression in the French is much nearer that of our own language than the Latin, and by consequence much easier to obtain. But the difference in the reading part betwixt the two languages is not so very great; and yet a boy shall be brought in two years, to read and speak the French well; whereas, in double the time, or more, spent at a grammar school, he shall be so far from talking and writing Latin, that he shall not be able to read half a dozen lines in the easiest classic author you can put into his hands. This slow advance is owing to more causes than one, as I have, I think, made appear sufficiently in my Essay upon the education of youth in grammar schools: But the main cause I take to be the want of the helps abovementioned; that is, literal translations. This, one would think,

« السابقةمتابعة »