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Accurate? 15. They drink large quantities of it in

fevers, in some forts of colics, and other acm acrimony? cute dileares ; and think it corrects the ac

rimony of the humours, removes obstructions vi/cera. of the viscera, and restores decayed fight.

16. That the gout and stone are unknown imaginary? in China, is ascribed to the use of this plant.

Some of the virtues attributed to tea, are un

doubtedly imaginary, and it has bad effects discretion ? upon some constitutions ; but experience shows,

that several advantages attend the drinking

it with discretion. astringent ? 17. It quickens the senses, prevents drowsi

nefs, corrects the heat of the liver, removes

the head-ach, especially that proceeding from Nrengthens. a crapula, and being greatly aftringent, it

strengthens the tone of the stomach.

1.

The Handsome and Deformed Leg. Comforts.

HERE are two forts of people in T

the world, who with equal degrees of

health and wealth, and the other comforts views. of life, becomes the one happy, and the other

miserable. This arises very much from the

different views in which they consider things, differeni. persons, and events; and the effect of those

different views upon their own minds. conveniencies. 2. In whatever situation men can be place

ed, they may find conveniencies, and incon

veniencies; in whatever company, they may worfe. find persons and conversation more or less

pleasing; at whatever table, they may meet poem, or work of genius, they may see faults Features. and beauties; in almost every face, and every person they may discover fine features and defeats ? defects, good and bad qualities.

with meats and drinks of better and worse taste. taste, dishes better and worse dressed; in

whatever climate they will find good and

bad weather; under whatever government, weather. they may find good and bad laws, and bad administration of those laws; in whatever

poem,

3. Under these circumstances, the two forts of people above-mentioned, fix their attention, pleafint. those who are disposed to be happy, on the .conveniencies of things, the plealant parts of conversation, the well dressed dishes, the good- cheerfulness. ness of the wines, the fine weather, &c. and enjoy all with cheerfulness.

4. Those who are to be unhappy, think and speak only of the contraries. Hence contraries. they are continually discontented themselves, and by their remarks, four the pleasures of fociety; offend personally many people, and make themselves every where disagreeable. pitied. If this turn of mind was founded in nature, such unhappy persons would be the more to be pitied.

5. But as the disposition to criticile, and to be disgusted, is perhaps, taken up originally by imitation, and is, unawares, grown into a habit, which, tho at present strong, may criticise ? nevertheless be cured, whien those who have it are convinced of its bad effects on their felicity; I hope this little admonition may be admonition? of service to them and put them on changing a habit, which, tho in the exercise it is chief. ly an act of imagination, yet has serious confe- service. quences in life, as it brings on real griefs and misfortunes.

6. For as many are offended by, and no body loves this sort of people; no one shews civility ? them more than the most common civility and respect, and scarcely that; and this frequently puts them out of humour, and draws them into difputes and contentions. If they ollaining? aim at obtaining fome advantage in rank or fortune, no body wishes them success, or will

G

stir

Pretentions ? ftir a step, or speak a word to favour their

pretentions. aggravate!

7. If they incur public censure or disgrace, no one will defend or excuse, and many join

to aggravate their mi conduct, and render odious ? them completely odious: If these people will

not change this bad habit, and condescend to

be pleafed with what is pleasing, without avoid? fretting themselves and others about their

contraries, it is good for others to avoid an acquaintance with them; which is always difagreeable, and sometimes very inconvenient, elpecially when one finds one's self entangled

in their quarrels. cautious. 8. An old philofophical friend of mine was

grown from experiente, very cautious in this

particular, and carefully avoided any intimaintimacy? cy with such people. He had like other phi

losophers, a thermometer to shew him the

heat of the weather; and a barometer, to thermometer ? mark when it was likely to prove good or

bad; but there being no instrument invented

to discover at first fight, this unpleasing dispobarometer ? fition in a person, he, for that purpose, made

use of his legs; one of which was remarkably handsome, the other, by some accident, crook

ed and deformed, interview ? 9. If a Atranger, at the first interview, re

garded his ugly leg more than his handsome one, he doubted him.

If he spake of it and took no notice of the handsome leg, that avas doubted. fufficient to determine my philosopher to have

no further acquaintance with him.

10. Every body has not this two legged in. carping ? ftrument; but every one with a little atten

tion, may observe signs of that carping, fault.

finding disposition, and take the fame refòlu. querulous. tion of avoiding the acquantance of those in

fected with it. I therefore advise those critical, querulous, discontented, unhappy people, that

if they wish to be respected and beloved by others, and happy in themselves, they should leave off looking at the ugly leg.

1

FEMALE MODESTY ;
or, the history of Julia and Roxana.
M

ODESTY and propriety of behav. Contribute

iour contribute fo laigely to the happiness of young Ladies, that their importance cannot be too strongly inculcated. inzulcato? They are admired, or despised more on account of their behaviour, than beauty. The charms of the latter are of short duration, but the charms, inspired by a modelt and easy behaviour, are never forgotten.

2. The flower blossoms in the spring, and blojums. is nipt by the first frost ; so beauty, at firlt light strikes the eye agreeably, but no fooner do illo pallions discover themselves in the mind of pop for? the poiTeffor, than the, who before appeared beautiful, ieems ugly and deformed.

3. In the language of the poet,

Beauty in vain her pretty eyes may roll, prelly. Charms strike the fighi, but merit wins the foul.' Modesty, especially in females, has been cele celebrated ? brated by the good and worthy of all ages and nations. 4. But we need not recur to

the testi. recur ? mony of ancient times, our own reason teach. es us its importance, and our own obfervation affords numerous examples of the happi- ancient? ness the affords. Take for instance the history of Julia and Roxana.

5. Julia and Roxana were born in a pleaf- amiable ? ant Town in America, where they had all the benefits of an early education. Their parents, who were wealthy and respectable, spared no

Pretentions ? ftir a step, or speak a word to favour their

pretentions. aggravate ? 7. If they incur public cenfure or disgrace,

no one will defend or excuse, and many join

to aggravate their mi conduct, and render odious ? them completely odious: If these people will

not change this bad habit, and condescend to

be pleased with what is pleasing, without avoid? fretting themselves and others about their

contraries, it is good for others to avoid an acquaintance with them; which is always difagreeable, and sometimes very inconvenient, elpecially when one finds one's self entangled

in their quarrels. cautious. 8. An old philosophical friend of mine was

grown from experience, very cautious in this

particular, and carefully avoided any intimaintimacy? cy with such people. He had like other phi.

losophers, a thermometer to shew him the

heat of the weather; and a barometer, to thermometer ? mark when it was likely to prove good or

bad; but there being no instrument invented

to discover at first fight, this unpleasing difpobarometer ? sition in a person, he, for that purpose, made

use of his legs; one of which was remarkably handsome, the other, by some accident, crook

ed and deformed, interview ? 9. If a franger, at the first interview, re

garded his ugly leg more than his handsome one, he doubted him. If he spake of it and

took no notice of the handsome leg, that was doubted. fufficient to determine my philosopher to have

no further acquaintance with him.

10. Every body has not this two legged in. carping ? strument; but every cne with a little atten

tion, may observe signs of that carping, fault.

finding difpofition, and take the same refòluquerulous. tion of avoiding the acquantance of those in

fected with it. I therefore advise those critical, querulous, discontented, unhappy people, that

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