Plutarch's Lives: The Translation Called Drydens's, المجلد 3

الغلاف الأمامي
Little, Brown, & Company, 1885
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

تقييمات المستخدمين

عدد النجوم: 5
4
عدد النجوم: 4
2
عدد النجوم: 3
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عدد النجوم: 2
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نجمة واحدة
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LibraryThing Review

معاينة المستخدمين  - JVioland - LibraryThing

In my opinion, the best book of the ancient world. Biographies of the greatest of the Greeks juxtaposed with the greatest of the Romans to teach that virtue is a noble pursuit. Very entertaining. One of my favorite books of all time. قراءة التقييم بأكمله

LibraryThing Review

معاينة المستخدمين  - JVioland - LibraryThing

In my opinion, the best book of the ancient world. Biographies of the greatest of the Greeks juxtaposed with the greatest of the Romans to teach that virtue is a noble pursuit. Very entertaining. One of my favorite books of all time. قراءة التقييم بأكمله

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مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 17 - When Cineas had led Pyrrhus with his argument to this point: "And what hinders us now, sir, if we have a mind to be merry, and entertain...
الصفحة 332 - Moreover observing how extremely subject the city was to fire, and falling down of houses, by reason of their height and their standing so near together, he bought slaves that were builders and architects, and when he had collected these to the number of more than five hundred, he made it his practice to buy houses that were on fire, and those in the neighborhood, which, in the immediate danger and uncertainty, the proprietors were willing to part with for little or nothing; so that the greatest...
الصفحة 161 - ... Calliphon, and the exiles who threw themselves at his feet, partly by the entreaties of the senators who attended him in that expedition, and being himself satiated with blood besides, he was at last prevailed upon to stop his hand ; and, in compliment to the ancient Athenians, he said, " He forgave the many for the sake of the few, the living for the dead.
الصفحة 142 - His general personal appearance may be known by his statues; only his blue eyes, of themselves extremely keen and glaring, were rendered all the more forbidding and terrible by the complexion of his face, in which white was mixed with rough blotches of fiery red. Hence, it is said, he was surnamed Sylla, and in allusion to it one of the scurrilous jesters at Athens made the verse upon him, Sylla is a mulberry sprinkled o'er with meal.
الصفحة 18 - And what hinders us now, sir, if we have a mind to be merry, and entertain one another, since we have at hand without trouble all those necessary thingH, to which through much blood and great labor, and infinite hazards and mischief done to ourselves and to others, we design at last to arrive...
الصفحة 402 - ... these barbarous people resided, who, imagining that all this preparation was for raising a mound to get at them, only mocked and laughed at it. However, he continued the work till the evening, and brought his soldiers back into their camp. The next morning a gentle breeze at first arose, and moved...
الصفحة 382 - IT is no great wonder if in long process of time, while fortune takes her course hither and thither, numerous coincidences should spontaneously occur. If the number and variety of subjects to be wrought upon be infinite, it is all the more easy for fortune, with such an abundance of material, to effect this similarity of results.
الصفحة 252 - ... statues. In the end their lot was to yield themselves up slaves to their creditors, but before this worse troubles befell them, tortures, inflicted with ropes and by horses, standing abroad to be scorched when the sun was hot, and being driven into ice and clay in the cold ; insomuch that slavery was no less than a redemption and joy to them. Lucullus in a short time freed the cities from all these evils and oppressions; for, first of all, he ordered there should be no more taken than one per...

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