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and what he admits, showing their superiority—How New England came to
be partially imbued with Anti-toleration—Independents, semi-separatists
Success of Toleration, hereafter-Edwards's simplicity-His spleen - The
Commons discountenance Toleration, as yet-Edwards, self-satisfied-- He is
stampt by Milton--His humiliating position, through a Female Antagonist,
She jeers at the fate of Edwards's forlorn-hope-He is caught next by an
ambush - He is now held at bay - Assaulted, positively- Negatively-
Conditionally-Still successfully repelled - She hoists her standard above

his-A thrust at Priests_Limits of Authority-Christ's Crown, main-

tained-A home-thrust- Further light into the cause of Inconsistency,

in New England - Of Edwards's Dependency–The burden of all Eccle-

siastical Imposts, how doubled upon all not of the Established Church

-Her Priests impoverished, wherefore-Her whole Worship, said to be un-

lawful-Defects, acknowledged-Compulsion-Avarice of Parish-priests—

Their Exactions-Price of Absolutions; their abomination The Smoke-

penny_Church-cormorants, Persecution, instigated by Priests— Edwards

and his brethren, how like Issachar's ass—Persecution, still pressed against

them-Effects of Persecution upon the outward conduct of the subjects

Edwards's spiritual Fatherhood, challenged-He is rallied for a Goliath-A

parley proposed.

CHAP. XLI.

TIIE LORDS BROOKE AND SAY.

Page 117.— Introduction to Milton's panegyric on Brooke-The passage, quoted

– Title of Brooke's Discourse-Adjuncts to a Scripture-Bishop-Rise of the
adulterate Bishop-Analytic process, stated-This kind of Bishop, whence
he springs Sarcastic stroke at the “ Congé d'elire”-Official maxims-Un-
reasonable-Practice, agreeing -Nothing * Indifferent,' in reality-Church's
Power, defined- Reason, contradicted; and Conscience forced- Consequents
upon our Bishop's ofice;" dependence-Past Obligations ; future Favours
- His freedom, in Parliament, incredible-His evil qualities, in Civil con-

verse-Pride, and abasement —“No Bishop, no King;" State-blasphemy-

Insolence, practised — Instances, adduced — Progress, through successive

Reigns-Doctrine-Church-Monarchy, a human device-Of Force-Epis.

copacy, not the only Church policy that may co-exist with Monarchy—“ Our

Episcopacy,” condemned-God's' rule, for Election and Ordination-All.

sufficiency of the Scriptures-Hall's defence of Episcopacy, evades the point

-Of Matt. xviii. 17 – Queries -- Solution, first - Second — Third- The

Whole Church, the Everything-Prelates, the real Schismatics-Whence the

increase of Nonconformists – To know the Separatists, hear them—Beauti-

ful description of vital godliness, and how it is reproached— Operations of

the Holy Spirit - Peace, invoked — Brooke's compatriot, Say, his two

Speeches; the first, for the reduction of Bishops to their original standard-

The common Incendiaries of the Christian world- Say's Second Speech;

its origin and effect—The Exordium-Rise and progress of Laud; his invece

tive against Say- Say begins to vindicate bimself-- His Retorts, on the charge

of not attending Prayers- Enjoined Prayer, a usurpation, a device of man--

An acceptable service, illustrated-Enjoined Preaching, or Reading, not God's

ordinance--"A theological scare-crow," Hales of Eton's charge against the

Hierarchy for setting up - Error of the “ Brownists”— Freedom of worship

implored.

CHAP. XLII.

STRAFFORD.-VOTE OF JULY 16TH, 1641.-BAGSHAWE.—WHITE.—THE BISHOPS'

FATAL PROTESTATION.-THE AFPAIR OF THE FIVE MEMBERS._ACT TO

EXCLUDE THE BISHOPS.-ORDINANCE CONTEMPLATING THE ASSEMBLY OF

DIVINES.- REMONSTRANCE OF MAY 26TH, 1642.-BOOK or SPORTS, ETC.-

CHARLES'S ADDRESS TO THE HOSTS. --GENERAL ASSEMBLY.-CATALOGUE OF

GRIEVANCES. -POSITION OF THE PARLIAMENT.

Page 137.- Beheading of Strafford; its effect upon other State culprits; a

poetical dialogue between Strafford and Laud-Vote, to Reform Episcopal
Government-Sixteen Particulars—Remarks, introductory to the title of
Bagshawe's “ Two Argument;"_Heylyn's account of Bagshawe's Readings,

at the Temple--Bagshawe's own account-Who the chief conflicting Parties;
a result foreseen, but not the catastrophe – The illegality of the New
Canons charged—Opposed to Common Law-Opposed to the spirit of
Magna Charta— These Canons void, from legal irregularity-Also, in them-
selves-- The Oath, how otherwise nullified - Wherein it Overthrows the
King's Supremacy—And, sets aside the King himself-Crafty substitution
of " See" for “Church” of Rome_Grounds of illegality, recapitulated-
Remarks—The Penalty incurred, by the Clergy- A Premunire-Defined
Its rigour, the consequence of perpetual encroachinent by the Clergy-Chan-
cellor Audley's rebuff, concerning the Bishops—Their Jus Divinum claim of
Jurisdiction, not admitted-Epigrammatic conclusion-White's description
of the Bishops' usurpations—Hall tries to implicate the King—The Bishops'
miscarriage, when they had wrought the popular rage to its height- Make
their presence necessary to the integrity of Parliaments-Excluded by Act
- The King's alleged “unadvised” rashness, and its consequences related-
He passes the Bill for excluding all persons in “ Holy Orders ” from Parlia.
ment, and further disabling them- The two Houses make an Ordinance
declaratory of a Reformation of the Church --- And avow the Popular basis
of the British Constitution - The king hoists bis Standard- The Commons'
Vote to suppress the Book of Sports, with other Ecclesiastical innovations
- The King, on the field, denounces bis “enemies,” specifically- The Par-

liament under apprehensions, confer with the General Assembly- They put

forth afresh the Catalogue of Grievances ; which increases dissension—They

show their superiority, under the peculiarities of the times.

CHAP. XLIII.

COTTON'S CONSTITUTION OF A CHURCH. ---HIS ANSWER TO BALL.-BREWSTER.

Page 154.-Circumstances under which Cotton transmitted bis Manuscripts-

This of the True Constitution, etc., declares his sentiments, of the mode of

conducting Public Worship-Of Church Government--of the Power in-

herent in the Church, derived through the body to the officers Title of

Cotton's Answer to Ball—Prayer, in general; how it becomes lawful-Posi-

tions stated and explained: necessity and expediency of Prescribed Prayer,

argued - No parallel can be reasonably drawn between reading the Scriptures

and reading Prayers—A shifting of the question, to argue from Prayers de-

vised by Men to those prescribed by God, or conversely— Necessity of set

words for harmonious Singing, no plea for imposed Prayer-Of Godly Helps

to Prayer– Why the intrusions upon Churches, of magistrates, ought to be

resisted-Of Catechisms and Confessions—Lawful Prayer; when, a will.

worship: a difference between the Word read and preached-- The Jews, and

Christ, afford no authority for imposing set Forms, by example-Reformed

foreign Churches, their liberty: Truth to be sought out; not to be taken

for granted -Unlawful administrations, to be withdrawn from-- Remarks

on another of Cotton's pieces-- Death of William Brewster- Account of

him.

CHAP. XLIV.

CONTROVERSY BY HERLE; R. MATHER AND W. THOMPSON; RUTHERFURD;

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officers-Elders existed before any Classis or Synod; whence no concurrence,
in the first Ordination of Elders — Choice of Ministers, if not by the Church;

what perplexities ensue- The Answerer's conclusion—Notice of Strictures

on the foregoing joint “ Answer," by Rutherfurd; and the “ Answer" de-

fended, by Mather-How disputes are beneficial— Number of Rutherfurd's

citations-His argument for “ appealing," wherein prejudicial— Further per-

plexity-Power to determine, instanced in Antioch-Of a power beyond

“ rebuking ;" and of what is any“ assembly" where preaching is ?-Doctrine,

dispensed by the Pastor; discipline, by the Church- Where does “

supre-

macy” lie?- Antioch's right, how inferred - Competency of three Elders to

decide- Discipline or Sacraments, which the greater- All Churches, have

equal authority—That, by the light of nature-Paul Baynes, of the Churches

at Thessalonica and Jerusalem - Those at Corinth, Ephesus, and Autioch,

each but one Congregation. The alleged Synod at Cambridge, N. E.-

Thomas Fuller-The Eldership alone, not a Church-No New Testament

record, that ordinary Pastors or Elders imposed hands on ordinary Pastors,

etc.-Election, essential ; and so, more than the rite of Ordination-S«rip-

ture tells what the Presbytery did to Timothy, but not what he must do with

one.

CHAP. XLV.

FERNE AND BRIDGE ON RESISTANCE.-BOOK OF SPORTS BURNT.-ASSEMBLY

OF DIVINES CALLED.-THEIR ADDRESS TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

SOLEMN LEAGUE AND COVENANT.THE FIVE DISSENTING BRETHREN.

Page 188.-Moral heroism, timely evinced -- Ferne and Bridge, in collision-

Bridge importuned to write on Civil Government— Bases of the argument

- Power springs from the People, and returns to them— Justice Fortescue

cited— Three grounds stated for the Parliament arming-Testimonies, for

Resistance—Scripture, animadverted upon-Bridge's principle of Tolera-

tion, finally announced—“ His Majesty's Book,” burned by the Hangman-

Title of the Ordinance for an Assembly of Divines—The Ordinance-Hey-

lyn's account of it-They and the Parliament communicate with Scotland-

Particulars – Foresight, and skilful conduct, of Nye and Vane-Speedy ap-

proval of the Covenant-Heylyn's description of its Enforcement-First

two Articles of the Covenant— The King prohibits it— Abuse bestowed on

the Westminster Assembly—The Five; or, The Anti-Scotia Phalanx.

CHAP. XLVI.

SIMPSOY'S FAST SERMON.- NYE'S EXHORTATION.—THE SCOTS' COMMISSIONERS.-

BAILLIE'S DISCLOSURES.-OF MIXT COMMUNION.

Page 205.–Title of Simpson's Sermon-His Exbortation to the House of Com-

mons-Text, etc.— Nye's Discourse before reading the Covenant in the pre-

sence of the Commons and the Assembly-Design of it- Against Popery-

Against Prelacy-What Baillie represents to be its chief aim; and, when

the Commissioners joined the Assembly—The debate of the office of Doctors,

and Ruling Elders--The Scots begin to intrigue with Foreigners—Tem-

porary procedure towards the Independents, Tracts on Mixt Communions.

CHAP. XLVII.

THE FAMOUS APOLOGETICAL NARRATION.THE SAINTS' APOLOGY.

Page 221.- Preamble; and the Title of the " Narration"-Disinterested conduct

of the Licenser-The Apologists address themselves to the Parliament-
Why they went into Exile-1 heir purpose–Found more Peace abroad, but
less Godliness than at home-Their Advantages, from Predecessors - And,
Encouragement, from their expatriated Brethren— Their special Resolution –
Their Charity-Order of their Worship-Officers, Discipline- Three Prin-
ciples; New Testament Churches, their pattern; present judgment, not
binding, absolutely; not to reject any, even the meanest member of Christ-
Free Prayer, preferred-Each Church, Congregational—Their Eldership-
of Communion of Sister Churches, and Suspension of such Communion-
of the Magistrates' interposing power-Strictures on Exemption” from
extrinsic authority– Ihese Apologists adopt “a Middle Way "-Complain
oncerning

their churches in Holland-- His hearsay of Simpson's idea of a Pastor-His

statement of Simpson's judgment of Ruling Elders- Somewhat that the

Apologists complain of respecting the imputation of Brownism–Of the

efficacy of their Excommunication of Churches— Title of Simpson's Answer

to Forbes-- Of this particular Controversy-False report of the constituents

of Simpson's church - And of Anabaptists in it-- Retort of “ Errors ” upon

other than Congregational churches-Proof that Simpson had Protection

from the State of Rotterdam; honourable alike to them and to him- Another

false report, respecting “a mutual Covenant "-- A flat contradiction to Forbes'

hearsay concerning Simpson's practice as a Pastor-- Again, Forbes is contra-

dicted respecting Ruling Elders-Simpson invokes impartial justice-Queries

Proposed; Anonymous-Disadvantage of Licensers-Both sets of Dispu.

tants watched - Consequence of voting the Bishops antichristian-A higher

standard of Religion sought for- The Assembly of Divines impugned- The

Civil Magistrate's province and safeguard- The Church's foundation spiritual

- Reformation, is not in Formalities-- Of more or less of Reformation-

Purity and Independence of Christ's churches--Forcible proposition con-

cerning universal Toleration–Of Witnesses for Christ- The argumentum

ad hominem applied to both sets of Reformers—A dilemma, out of the

Sacraments—Ainplitude of Toleration required-A State Church, an aggre.

gate of Evils- Full title of “ Some Observations," etc., by Adam Steuart-

The Imprimatur— The author's vexation at the “Five" combining—And that,

against the Scots particularly-- Anecdote of James I.-A. S. betrays surprise

at the Apologists—Charges them with accommodating themselves to the

occasion-He turns a coaxer--Impeaches their sincerity-Singularity of his

logic-Collection of his taunts.

CHAP. XLIX.

BAILLIE.--Cotton's “KEYs.”_"SION'S VIRGINS."
Page 251. - Finesse exposed--Again-Baillie's report of certain proceedings; and

his apprehension of the Independents' power in the Assembly-- T. Goodwin
opposes the Directory-Baillie plots with Spang-Consternation produced
by the Apologetical Narration- Artifice resorted to-Expedients regarding
Ordination - They fail -- Assembly heat-Independents unmanageable-
Aspect of Public affairs-Title of Cotton's treatise on the Keys ”– The
Power of, claimed by the Publishers, for the right heirs — The Key of Know-
ledge, its effects-Too much Power claimed for the People-Equitable
adjustment of it-As in Commonwealths—The will of Christ imagined
Cotton's distribution of Church-power, set out-His scheme, or theory-
Asserted to be the very “Middle-way" of the Apologists—This coincidence
remarked upon--Of Prophesying, under four cautions - And, of a formal
Synod— The People's interest, and the Elders' authority, illustrated-A com-
bination of Elders of several churches, why not intrusted with the Key of
Discipline--- Remark of the Publishers---Cotton's first chapter, What the

1

Keys, etc. be-Ilis second, Of their Distribution-His third, Assignment of

those of Knowledge and Order–His fourth, Of the Key of Church-Privilege

-His fifth, Of the Key of Authority–His sixth, of the Power given to

Synods—His seventh, Touching the First Subject of all Power; with an

explanation of Independency." Sion's Virgins,” Queries on Baptism-It

is not the Creature going in and out of Water—That Infants are of the

Kingdom—The mode of Baptizing-Distinction between the Seals under

the Gospel.

CHAP. L.

PURITAN TRACT, EDITED BY RATHBAND.—JOHNSON.]

Page 272. — Title, “A Most Grave and Modest Confutation, etc."- Quotation

from Baxter, concerning it— Ratbband's statement of its origination- Why
produced then-Cautionary remark—Charges against the Brownists, etc.,
set down, as justifying themselves, by the Puritan Writers of this Tract-
Separatists, addressed— And then, Waverers—Next, Puritans—Lastly, their
Church-Excusatory appeal -- Length, apologised for— The divisions of the
Treatise—“Brownist” objection, against the “ Puritansin limine- Defence

by a perverse application of the term “ Anti-christian "-Remarkable con-

cessions regarding the necessity of Ordination-Equivocation about Oaths-

Maintenance, curiously vindicated-And, in four other paragraphs-Scripture

places, or references, alleged to be unskilful— These Puritans' infelicitous

Conclusion; instances from-Their testimony against themselves—Two

queries, instanced— Their accusation, of shameful Lying, confuted— Their

spirit, sufficiently exposed.—Johnson's Treatise of the Ministry of the Church

of England-Proofs of the authorship-Popish and English Priests, wherein

they agree; and wherein they differ from Pastors appointed by Christ-Con-

firmed, under thirty-three divisions.

CHAP. LI.

RATHBAND AND HIS OPPONENT, WELDE.

Page 289.—Remark on the course pursued in these Historical Memorials; with

the title of the “ Brief Narrative"--Author's apology-Reasons for his plan

being synoptical-His limitations—Method of exhibiting the “Brief Narra-

tive with the “Answer"_Title of Welde's Answer-His announcements

concerning this production-He reduces Rathband's method to three particu-

lars, and characterizes them— Their grounds, also three-And the printed

authorities, perverted— The private Letters, incompetent proofs-- Remark,

introductory-Chap. i. Of Platform and Discipline.--Chap. ii. Of the true

Visible Church, in general -- Chap. iii. Of the Matter of it-Chap. iv. Of its

Form—Chap. v. of the first erecting a Visible Church.

CHAP. LII.

RATHBAND AND WELDE, CONTINUED.

Page 315.—Chap. vi. Of Church Power-Chap. vii. Of Membership-Chap.

viii. Of Dismission-Chap. ix. Of Communion, in general-Chap. x. Of

Communion of Churches—Chap. xi. Of Excommunication, and Re-accep-

tance ---Chap. xii. Of Officers -- Chap. xiii. Of Prophets -- Chap. xiv. Of

Independency; and of Combination into Classes, etc.—Chap. xv. Of the

Magistrate. - Rathband's Postcript– Welde's Postcript.

CHAP. LIII.

Page 341.–Full Title of this reply to A. S.-Why Anonymous—Commotion

created by the “ Apology"-Cranford-Ridiculous Epithets– New England
Elders disallow Presbytery-Folly of Peremptoriness-A. S. and W. R.
confronted— Parliament resolve concerning the Apologetical Narration-The
Scots' Commissioners and A. S.- Opposition endured by the Apologists-
Arrogance of A. S., how met—The Five, applauded— Modes of Discipline
contrasted—Effects of forcing Conscience--M. S., his idea concerning 'Tole-
ration-John Goodwin's portion of this Reply; his preface-Of Presbyterian
malevolence-Four Signs, indicative of religious peace-False position of the

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