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EVERLASTING GOSPEL,

COMMANDED TO BE PREACHED BY

JESUS CHRIST, JUDGE OF THE LIVING AND THE DEAD,

UNTO ALL CREATURES, (MARK XVI. 15,)

CONCERNING

THE ETERNAL REDEMPTION

FOUND OUT BY HIM, WHEREBY

DEVIL, SIN, HELL AND DEATH

SHALL AT LAST BE ABOLISHED, AND

THE WHOLE CREATION RESTORED

TO ITS PRIMITIVE PURITY:

BEING A TESTIMONY

AGAINST THE PRESENT ANTI-CHRISTIAN WORLD.

WRITTEN ORIGINALLY IN GERMAN

BY PAUL SIEGVOLCK,

PHILADELPHIA.

GIHON, FAIRCHILD & Co.

TO THE

INFINITE AND EVERLASTING

LOVE,

OUT OF WHOM, THROUGH WHOM, AND TO whom, are alL THINGS;、

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Most mercifully and powerfully to bless it for the End it is intended, and to defend it against the Devil and his whole host of evil Angels and Men, whose Interest it is that the Everlasting Love should not have the sole Dominion over the whole Creation, and come to be ALL IN ALL,)

By

PAUL SEIGVOLCK.

TO THE READER.

THERE have been many books published in our language upon the subject of the restitution of all fallen intelligences; some of them fraught with learning and criticism, as Dr. Burnet's piece on the state of the dead; the Chevalier Ramsay's philosophical principles of natural and revealed religion; and above all of this kind, the treatise of Mr. Stonehouse, late vicar of Islington: a work which is worthy of the notice of the learned world, I have found this little book very useful to

and to which I do not know that there has ever been an answer attempted.

myself. I did not, like Mr. Winchester, receive my first conviction of the truth of the universal doctrine from it; but it was the mean of fully establishing my mind in it. I remember particularly, that the seventh pter, which treats of the word eternity, and the different eternities, or ages, mentioned in the scriptures, was very satisfying to me; as was the eleventh chapter, which treats of this present world, the world to come, and the still, or silent eternity.

I know of no book that is more calculated to disseminate the universal doctrine among good men, than this; for every one who has tasted that GOD is Love, will here find some thing that meets and accords with the warm and holy benevolence of his soul; and to them I do most heartily recommend it; being fully assured, that however such may differ in other things, they all bear in their hearts good will towards men.

While the above gentlemen have written on this great subject for the learned, others have no less laudably employed their talents for the service of the bulk of mankind, by bearing their testimony to the universal and efficacious love of God to his rational creatures, in plain popular style: among whom we find Mr. Jeremiah White in the last century, and Mr. Winchester of late; the latter of whom has not only presented to the world, the evidence of the restoration of all things, in his dialogues, lectures on prophecy, and numerous other tracts; but has also favoured mankind with the first edition of Mr. Seigvolck's book, that has been printed in Old England. Notwithstanding the opposition which some mistaken (but otherwise good) men have made to the universal doctrine, the first impression of this piece is sold off; so that a copy of it has been hardly to be procured for above twelve months past, though it was published only in 1792. A proof this, that mankind begin to have their eyes more opened, and their hearts more expanded, than former-]

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ly; and that, instead of the contracted senti. ments which have long set Christians at bitter variance with each other, they now begin to think themselves the children of one com. mon Father, whose mercy, whose tender mercy, is over all the works of his hands.May this view of the IMMORTAL GOD, is Christ Jesus, increase, until discord and hatred are banished from the earth.

They will not, therefore, be offended at my subscribing myself,

A Friend to all Mankind,
WILLIAM VIDLBB.

London, June 8th, 1795.

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PREFACE.

and first published at the instance and expense of that remarkable man.

The edition published in London, by Mr. Winchester, was exhausted in less than two years, as we learn from the preface of a second edition, published by Rev. Mr. Vidler, in 1795. He says, notwithstanding the opposition which some mistaken (but otherwise good) men have made to the universal doctrine, the first impression of this piece is sold off; so that a copy of it has been hardly to be procured for above twelve months past, though it was published only in 1792."

Of the author of this work, I regret that I have it in my power to say very little. Mr. Whittemore, in his Modern History of UniverIt first appeared in English at Germantown, salism, p. 128, note, says, on the authority of near Philadelphia, in 1753. It was probably a friend in Ohio, that "Seigvolck was born brought to this country by some of the Ger- and educated in Harford-schles in Holland; man Baptists, who are known to have sym- and flourished in the time of William, Prince pathised with its author in the faith of uni- of Orange. He was not a regular clergyman, versal salvation. This edition was printed as appears from his own preface to his Uniby Christopher Sower, and purports to have versal Gospel, which was originally written been "translated into English by John S," in Low Dutch, and shortly after translated probably a son or brother of the printer. into the German language. He was contemThere is every reason to suppose that it was porary with three others, who preached the thus introduced to the readers of English, same doctrine; Fisher, Shetz and Shepherd, through the influence of Dr. George de Ben- as appears from letters of correspondence neville, who came to this country about 1740, between them. Shetz was considered a more and was at this time residing in the imme-able advocate of the doctrine than Seigvolck. diate neighbourhood of Germantown. His They preached much in the Low Countries, long-tried and active zeal in the cause of and made many proselytes among the HolUniversalism, renders it in the highest degree landers. They were greatly persecuted, till probable, that he was deeply concerned in the Prince of Orange gave them toleration,and this publication. His previous residence for arrested the civil arm which was about to be several years in Germany had, it is likely, raised against them." Of the truth of this made him acquainted with this treatise there. account Mr. Whittemore expressed some Rev. Elhanan Winchester, who published an doubts, which were certainly well founded. edition of Seigvolck's Everlasting Gospel in London, 1792, uses the following language in reference to its translation in America: "This little book, which I now send abroad in this country, was originally written in the German language in the beginning of the present century and printed in Pennsylvania in 1753. I am well acquainted with the good man at whose instance and expense it was translated and printed. He had lived to see the little spark rise into a flame, and the small seed into a large tree; and may he still live many years, until this glorious system, so grand, so worthy of God, shall have prevailed to bring all the different sects of Christians to be of the same spirit, mind and judgment." I know not to whom this allusion would so naturally apply, as to Dr. Benneville, for whom it is known Mr. Winchester entertained the highest respect and the warmest friendship. I can, therefore, indulge no doubts that the Everlasting Gospel was translated

In the first place, Seigvolck was not cotemporary with William, Prince of Orange, if William I. the younger, generally called the Prince of Orange, be meant; for he was assassinated in 1584, while Seigvolck could not have been born till nearly a century after this date. But not to dwell on this point, I nowhere find the slightest intimation, except in the quotation above, that Seigvolck was a Hollander, or that this work was written originally in Low Dutch. In the German I discover no traces of its being a translation, nor does Peterson drop a hint that it Speaking of the delay in bringing out the first volume of his work, he says, "Still I see the providence of God in this, as also in other things-that I have meanwhile received an excellent treatise on the subject, which is very precious and may properly be called a compendium of this whole work, and which I here communicate."

so.

Nor do I find any thing in Seigvolck's "own

THE little work here presented to the readers of the "Library," is perhaps the most remarkable treatise contained in the whole volume. It was originally written in German, and was, I believe, first published in Peterson's "Mystery of the Restitution of all things," vol. I., which appeared in 1700. In this very valuable work, the Universalist Historical Society, possesses the original edition of Seigvolck's Everlasting Gospel. During the former part of the last century, it went through several editions. It was republished at Leipsic in 1705, and again in 1713. In 1730 a new edition appeared at Frankfort and Leipsic, and another in 1743, at Altona.

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