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11

must give it to the successor,

I.
284, &c.
Government, it is absolutely ne. JACOB became not a sovereign
cessary to know who has the

by getting the birth-right, 298
right to it,

275 ' James I. (king of England) his
how many ways it may judgment of tyranny, 457
be dissolved, 464, &c. Inheritance, how goods came to

what right the commu- descend by it from parents to
nity have to preserve them. children,

282, 283
selves, under ill management

political government
of it,

468 naturally descends by it, no
no great danger of a more than conjugal, 286
people's being forward to Interest (of money) cannot be ef-
change it,

471 fectually limited by a law 4
the end of it is the good the ill consequences of at-
of mankind,

412, &c. tempting to limit it, 5, 6
Barclay himself allows

the difference between
the people to defend themselves natural and legal interest, 9
from the tyrannical abuse of

what raises the natural
it,
476 interest,

ibid.
how the abuse of it can be no more limited
may be resisted,

478 than the hire of houses and
when, according to ships,

10
Barclay, governors lose their the mischiefs of reducing
right to it,

478, 481

it low,
who must be judge

the rent of land, &c. m y
when it is forfeited by those as well be limited,

36
who are intrusted with it, 483

sinking it, increases not
Guineas, how raising them impo- the value of other commodities,
verished the nation, 194

but the contrary,

32

yet it is fit the law should
H.

lay some restraint upon it, and
why,

63
HEIR, (to government)none can reasons for 61. per cent.

be so but by the laws of the being the best proportion, 64
community,

292

the height of it no pre-
controversies about him, judice to trade,

66
have caused great mischief in why it is low in Holland,
nations,
292

66-69
primogeniture gives no na- if it were generally low,
tural right to be so, 301, 302 it would be an advantage to
Holland, why the interest of mo-

trade,

69
ney is low there,

67

the lowering of it would
- men may lend there for render it more difficult to bor.
as much interest as they can

76
get,

ibid. Judah (the patriarch) had no do-
why the merchants of it minion of life and death, 309
undersell others,

80
how ducatoons came to

K.
be scarce there,

95
Hooker, his judgement concern- KINGDOM grows rich or power-

ing civil government, 346 erful, just as a farmer does, 19

row,

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LABOUR, much more owing to MONARCHY, how govern-
it than to nature,

361-362 ment, at first, generally came
Labour first gave right to pro- to be so, 400. Vid. Absolute
perty,

364 Monarchy.
Land, the yearly rent of it might Money due to foreigners cannot

better be limited than the in- always be paid in goods or bills
terest of money,

36, 37
of exchange,

17
the price of it rises not by necessity of a proportion of
lowering the interest, 30.- it in trade,

21
The cause of this,

37 want of it very injurious to
-- rises in proportion to the landholders,

25
number of buyers,

39, 53 - lowering the value of it
what increases the sellers of increaseth not the value of
it,

53
other things,

30—35
what diminishes the number it is valued according to the
of its purchasers,

54 plenty or scarcity of commodi-
the value of it decreases

ties,

30, 32, 34, 36
with the decay of trade, ibid. mischievous consequences
too much advance of its

of a scarcity of it, 47–50
price an injury to the public, 62 want of it at last falls upon
why men pay taxes for it, land,

7375
though mortgaged,

75 how the value of it may be
- how it came at first to be said to be raised, 82-86
appropriated,

360 it cannot be really raised,
Landholders, want of trade a unless in proportion to its

great loss to them, 25, 54, 56 plenty or scarceness, 82
Laws (human) must not be con- raising in denomination,

trary to the law of nature or tends to impoverish a nation,
scripture,
419, note

86
Legislative power, how it is is valued according to the
bounded,

423

quantity of silver contained in
Liberty, how men are by nature it, 89-How it comes to be
in the state of it,

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339 otherwise when clipped, 94
- wherein it consists, 351 the advantage of it in com-

restraint by the law of merce above uncoined silver,
nature consistent with it, 341

88
how far it is given up, by the cause of melting it
becoming members of a com-

90
monwealth,

396, &c.

it is better for the public to
Lineal succession, not restored be milled than hammered, 91
in the kings of Israel, 337 raising the denomination
none observed among

will not hinder the exportation
the rulers of Israel till David's of it,

91, 93
time,

334 the value of it should be
Lowndes (Mr.) propounded to kept as steady as possible, 103

have our money reduced to the proportion should al-
one-fifth less value, 153 ways be exactly kept between

his reasons for lessening that of gold and silver, 97, 99
the value of

money,

answered, constant equality of its
ibid. value, the interest of every
country,

ibid.

down,

Money, making it lighter than it Money, lowering its value will not
should be is unjust, 109, &c. render it more generally use-
lowering it, no advantage ful,

ibid.
in selling and letting of land, - it cannot be of the full

112, &c.

price of bullion, because of
why so little is sometimes exporting the latter, 184
coined,

119 the true raising it is by put-
it is really valuable accord- ing more silver in it,

185
ing to its weight, 139.- This - how it has been altered in
must be understood of silver former times, 185,--and the
without the alloy,

140 most probable occasion of it,
why so much was coined

187
in queen Elizabeth's time, and Money, how to prevent the melt-
after,

130 ing of it down or exporting
how it answers all things, it,

199
139 how the use of it first en-
the denomination alters not larged the extent of property,
the intrinsic value, ibid.

365-366
lessening its real value is Vid. Interest of Money.
worse than clipping, 146
its being current only for

N.
its weight, is the most effectual
way to stop the mischief of NATURE, men are by it in a
clipping,
147 state of equality,

340
- it is necessary in proportion

by it people have
to the plenty of it in neigh- liberty, but not licence, 341
bouring nations,

148

in the state of it, every
it will always be of equal one has right to punish the
value with the same weight of breach of its law,

3+1, 342
standard silver,

158

- the inconveniences of
-what causes the exportation it not greater than of absolute
of it,
160 monarchy,

345
- it ought not to be made

independent princes
lighter, though silver were are still in the state of it, 346
grown dearer,

164 Noah had authority given him,
lessening it would be a in common with his sons, 235
gain to money hoarders, but a was not the sole heir of the
loss to others,
166 world,

238
by making it one-fifth light- had a greater dominion
er, creditors and landlords lose over the creatures than Adam,
20 per cent.
168

239
and labourers also lose by none of his sons heir to
it, unless they have one-fifth Adam, more than the rest, 316
more wages,

170
the change of its name

P.
will not alter its value, 177

the insignificancy of lessen- PAR (in the exchange of money)
ing, explained by familiar

what it means,

149
similitudes,

ibid. Parental power, perhaps a more
if a crown of it (e. g.) be fit phrase than (as usual)
called 75 pence, it will buy no paternal power,

367, 368
more goods than if it be called

how it differs from
180 political,

378

60 pence,

use

Parents, their power temporary, Property, how men come to have
but the honour due to them it,

361, 367
perpetual,

375

how it is naturally
the ground and extent of bounded,

368, &c.
their
power over their children,

in land and other things,
370, &c.

at first required by labour, ibid.
may give masters

au-

how this is a common ad-
thority to
force upon
vantage,

364
their children,

377

it was at length settled
Patriarch, this name denotes not by law,

371
having sovereign power from

cannot be rightly taken
Adam,

315 from any, without their con.
Perjury, to be carefully prevent- sent,

*422
ed by law-makers,

6 Providence, the bounty of it, in
frequent oaths a great making the most useful things
occasion of it,

6 commonly the cheapest, 41
Peru, some of the inhabitants
fattened and eat children, 254

R.
Political power, what it is, 338 REBELLION, the word some-

-339

times used for a lawful war,
though in some cases it

474
is as
absolute,” yet not “ arbi.

the best means to pre-
trary,"

422

vent it, is good government,
Political societies, how framed,
394

ibid.
how they began, 400, &c.

governors may be
must be determined by

guilty of it as well as the
governed,

ibid.
the majority, unless they agree Rents, the advantage of paying
on a greater number, 395

them quarterly, or weekly, 27
why we have no histori-

the causes of their falling,
cal account of their beginning,
&c.

69, 70
Power, paternal, political,' and Representatives of the people,

how sometimes very unequal,
despotical,
440

432, 433
Vid. Supreme.

corrupting them, or
Prerogative, wherein it consists,

pre-engaging the electors, tends
434, &c.

to dissolve the government,
how and why it is

470
sometimes limited, 437

Resistance of tyranny, when it
the end of it is the
is lawful,

476
public good,

ibid.

when it is lawful to be
-- who may judge con-

used,

ibid.
cerning the right or wrong use

it is warrantable to use
of it,

438
-- if people are injured

it, for repelling illegal force,

482
by it, they may appeal to hea-

S.
ven,

439
Price of things not always pro- SELLERS, plenty of them
portionable to their usefulness, makes things cheap, 39

41

Shem (the patriarch) was no ab-
of foreign commodities ad- solute monarch, 321, &c.
vances by being taxed, but Silver is ten times more plentiful

that of home ones falls, 58 now, than two hundred years
Price, the reason of this, ibid.

ago, and why,

47

397,

upon land,

more

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Silver, it is therefore nine parts in

T.
ten cheaper,

ibid.
properly speaking, none of TAXES generally fall at last
it is finer than other, 140

55-57
measures the value of other

increase the price of
things,

140, 141

foreign, but lessen that of home
how standard is in England commodities,

59
proportioned with alloy, 142,

though laid upon trade
143

in Holland, yet they chiefly
the advantages of its being

impoverish landholders, 60,61,
mixed with copper in money, Trade is hindered by lowering

ibid.
the interest of money,

12
is brought in by an overba- enriches a nation
lance of trade,

148, 149
than mines do,

ibid.
is alone the measure of Trade, when it is gainful, or a
commerce, and not gold, 151, loss to a nation,

18
152

the general decay of it les-
when it may be said to rise seps the value of land, 5, &c.
or fall in the value of it, 154,

what is the overbalance of
155 it,

148
it is always in value accord. Tyranny, wherein it consists, 457
ing to its weight, if standard,

speech of king James I.
150
concerning it,

ibid.
how unreasonable it is to

the greatness of the per-
pretend it to be worth more un. sons exercising it aggravates
coined, than coined, 171-173 the crime,

459
whence uncoined some-

U.
times advances in the price of
it,

174 USURPATION, wherein it con-
Slavery, it is hard to suppose

sists,

455
anyone to plead for it in
earnest,

212 WAR, the state of it describ-
wherein it consists, 351 ed,

347, &c.
Slaves, men are not born such,

he that seeks the life or
213, &c.

liberty of another, is in a state
the Israelites were not

ibid.
so, when returned out of E-

how it differs from the
gypt,
329 state of nature,

348
Jacob's ons were not

avoiding it, the design of
such, as appears by Reuben

forming society,

350
and Judah,

330 West-Indies, some nations there
Society, vid. Conjugal and Poli-

have no supreme governor,
tical.

unless in time of war, 398, 402
Spain is itself poor, though it Wheat, more fit than most other

furnishes all other nations with things, for a common measure
gold and silver,
72 of trade,

46
Supreme power of the common-

it is not so useful for ex-
wealth, where it lies, 427

change as money,

47

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of it,

END OF THE FOURTH VOLUME.

C. Baldwin, Printer,
New Bridge-street, London.

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