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and winding up his affairs. The time has been, that when the brains were out, the man would die ; but Döring orders

; these matters differently.

We beg leave to say, however, that we really have no private pique against Döring: on the contrary, we are regular purchasers of his ware; and it gives us true pleasure to see his spirits so much improved since we first met him. In the Life of Schiller, his state did seem rather unprosperous : he wore a timorous, submissive, and downcast aspect, as if, like Sterne's Ass, he were saying, “Don't thrash me; but if you will, you may !' Now, however, comforted by considerable sale, and praise from this and the other Literaturblatt, which has commended his diligence, his fidelity, and, strange to say, his method, he advances with erect countenance and firm hoof, and even recalcitrates contemptuously against such as do him offence. Glück auf dem Weg! is the worst we wish him.

Of his Life of Richter, these preliminary observations may be our excuse for saying but little. He brags much, in his Preface, that it is all true and genuine ; for Richter's widow, it seems, had, by public advertisement, cautioned the world against it ; another Biography, partly by the illustrious deceased himself, partly by Otto, his oldest friend and the appointed editor of his works, being actually in preparation. This rouses the indignant spirit of Döring, and he stoutly asseverates, that, his documents being altogether authentic, this biography is no pseudo-biography. With greater truth he might have asseverated that it was no biography at all. Well are he and Hennings of Gotha aware that this thing of shreds and patches has been vamped together for sale only. Except a few letters to Kunz, the Bamberg bookseller, which turn mainly on the purchase of spectacles, and the journeyings and freightage of two boxes that used to pass and repass between Richter and Kunz's

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circulating library; with three or four notes of similar im. portance, and chiefly to other booksellers, there are no biographical documents here, which were not open to all Europe as well as to Heinrich Döring. Indeed, very nearly one half of the Life is occupied with a description of the funeral and its appendages, - how the sixty torches, with a number of lanterns and pitch-pans,' were arranged ; how this Patrician or Professor followed that, through Fried. rich-street, Chancery-street, and other streets of Bayreuth; and how at last the torches all went out, as Doctor Gabler and Doctor Spatzier were perorating (decidedly in bombast) over the grave. Then, it seems, there were meetings held in various parts of Germany, to solemnize the memory of Richter ; among the rest, one in the Museum of Frankfort on the Maine ; where a Doctor Börne speaks another long speech, if possible in still more decided bombast. Next come threnodies from all the four winds, mostly on very splay-footed metre. The whole of which is here snatched from the kind oblivion of the newspapers, and lives in Settle's numbers one day more.'

We have too much reverence for the name of Richter to think of laughing over these unhappy threnodists and panegyrists ; some of whom far exceed anything we English can exhibit in the epicedial style. They rather testify, however maladroitly, that the Germans have felt their loss, which, indeed, is one to Europe at large; they even affect us with a certain melancholy feeling, when we consider how a heavenly voice must become mute, and nothing be heard in its stead but the whoop of quite earthly voices, lamenting, or pretending to lament. Far from us be all remembrance of Döring and Company, while we speak of Richter! But his own works give us some glimpses into his singular and noble nature ; and to our readers a few

words on this man, certainly one of the most remarkable of his age,

will not seem thrown away.

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Except by name, Jean Paul Friedrich Richter is little known out of Germany. The only thing connected with him, we think, that has reached this country, is his saying, imported by Madame de Staël, and thankfully pocketed by most newspaper critics : • Providence has given to the French the empire of the land, to the English that of the sea, to the Germans that of - the air !' Of this last ele. ment, indeed, his own genius might easily seem to have been a denizen : so fantastic, many-colored, far-grasping, everyway perplexed and extraordinary is his mode of writing, that to translate him properly is next to impossible ; nay, a dictionary of his works has actually been in part published for the use of German readers! These things have restricted his sphere of action, and may long restrict it, to his own country : but there, in return, he is a favorite of the first class; studied through all his intricacies with trustful admiration, and a love which tolerates much. During the last forty years, he has been continually before the public, in various capacities, and growing generally in esteem with all ranks of critics ; till, at length, his gainsayers have been either silenced or convinced ; and Jean Paul, at first reckoned half-mad, has long ago vindicated his singularities to nearly universal satisfaction, and now combines popularity with real depth of endowment, in perhaps a greater degree than any other writer ; being second in the latter point to scarcely more than one of his contemporaries, and in the former second to none.

The biography of so distinguished a person could scarcely fail to be interesting, especially his autobiography; which, accordingly, we wait for, and may in time submit to our readers, if it seem worthy: meanwhile, the history of his

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life, so far as outward events characterize it, may be stated in few words. He was born at Wunsiedel in Bayreuth, in March, 1763. His father was a subaltern teacher in the Gymnasium of the place, and was afterwards promoted to be clergyman at Schwarzbach on the Saale. Richter's early education was of the scantiest sort; but his fine faculties and unwearied diligence supplied every defect. Unable to purchase books, he borrowed what he could come at, and transcribed from them, often great part of their contents, -a habit of excerpting which continued with him through life, and influenced, in more than one way, his mode of writing and study. To the last, he was an insatiable and universal reader; so that his extracis accumulated on his hands, till they filled whole chests.' In 1780, he went to the University of Leipsic; with the highest character, in, spite of the impediments which he had struggled with, for talent and acquirement. Like his father, he was destined for Theology; from which, however, his vagrant genius soon diverged into Poetry and Philosophy, to the neglect, and, ere long, to the final abandonment, of his appointed profession. Not well knowing what to do, he now accepted a tutorship in some family of rank; then he had pupils in his own house, - which, however, like his way

of life, he often changed; for by this time he had become an author, and, in his wanderings over Germany, was putting forth, now here, now there, — the strangest books, with the strangest titles: For instance, Greenland Law.

Biographical Recreations under the Cranium of a Giantess ; -- Selection from the Papers of the Devil;

- and the like. In these indescribable performances, the splendid faculties of the writer, luxuriating as they seemed in utter riot, could not be disputed ; nor, with all its extrava. gance, the fundamental strength, honesty, and tenderness of his nature. Genius will reconcile men to much. By de

suits ;

words on this man, certainly one of the most remarkable of his age, will not seem thrown away.

.

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Except by name, Jean Paul Friedrich Richter is little known out of Germany. The only thing connected with him, we think, that has reached this country, is his saying, imported by Madame de Staël, and thankfully pocketed by most newspaper critics : • Providence has given to the French the empire of the land, to the English that of the sea, to the Germans that of the air !! Of this last element, indeed, his own genius might easily seem to have been a denizen : so fantastic, many-colored, far-grasping, everyway perplexed and extraordinary is his mode of writing, that to translate him properly is next to impossible ; nay, a dictionary of his works has actually been in part published for the use of German readers! These things have restricted his sphere of action, and may long restrict it, to his own country : but there, in return, he is a favorite of the first class ; studied through all his intricacies with trustful admiration, and a love which tolerates much. During the last forty years, he has been continually before the public, in various capacities, and growing generally in esteem with all ranks of critics ; till, at length, his gainsay. ers have been either silenced or convinced; and Jean Paul, at first reckoned half-mad, has long ago vindicated his sin, gularities to nearly universal satisfaction, and now combines popularity with real depth of endowment, in perhaps a greater degree than any other writer ; being second in the latter point to scarcely more than one of his contemporaries, and in the former second to none.

The biography of so distinguished a person could scarcely fail to be interesting, especially his autobiography; which, accordingly, we wait for, and may in time submit to our readers, if it seem worthy: meanwhile, the history of his

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