At Home in Paris: And a Trip Through the Vineyards to Spain

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W. H. Allen & Company, 1864 - 350 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 184 - Roused though it be full often to a mood Which spurns the check of salutary bands, That this most famous Stream in bogs and sands Should perish ; and to evil and to good Be lost for ever. In our halls is hung Armoury of the invincible Knights of old : We must be free or die, who speak the tongue That Shakspeare spake; the faith and morals hold Which Milton held. — In every thing we are sprung Of Earth's first blood, have titles manifold.
الصفحة 41 - It has long been agreed on all hands, that it is prudent to be on excellent terms with the man who guards the gate of your house, who receives your letters, and who knows many of your secrets. He is laughed at, but he remains strong. His tyranny is felt every hour in the day, but Paris must be rebuilt before it can be shaken off. He can be punished if he betrays his trust ; a lodger can compel the landlord to dismiss him, if he misbehaves himself; but while he is merely a reckless gossip, a malicious...
الصفحة 254 - Study. A. IF I do this what further can I do ? B. Why, more than ever. Every task thou dost Brings strength and capability to act. He who doth climb the difficult mountain's top, Will the next day outstrip an idler man. Dip thy young brain in wise men's deep discourse, — In books, which though they freeze thy wit awhile, Will knit thee, i
الصفحة 30 - ... springs up between him and your cook. He must know when the price of peaches is low enough for your pocket ; and that you quarrelled with the cobbler over his charge for mending your shoes. Every detail of your contract with the traiteur is his property. You drink Bordeaux at twenty-five sous the litre, and he knows it ; and it is only when you have friends, you go even as far as Beaune. The fowls are too dear in the market to-day for Madame ; the cook has told him so with a toss of the head...
الصفحة 271 - ... the moral spectacle of a nation that depends upon herself alone. To have a complete idea, however, of the unprecedented grandeur of this nation, we must also take into consideration that, unlike her predecessors in commerce, who never held more than the most limited moral influence over the nations with which they came in contact, she acts more than any other on the destinies, the mind, and the manners of the rest of the world. Already she is the model school for the agriculturists, the manufacturers,...
الصفحة 30 - Majesty to realise those millions which "the prosperity of the Empire" compels him to borrow. The privileges of the concierge are bearable. Let him take the biggest log when you are supplied with half a 'load of wood. You pay him the expected gratification when you return home after midnight. You cannot help the fast friendship that springs up between him and your cook. He must know when the price of peaches is low enough for your pocket ; and that you quarrelled with the cobbler over his charge...
الصفحة 273 - And so in the moral world, when Nature has something rare to produce she exhibits the like perseverance and insensibility — the like exclusive determination to her end. She acted in this way in the formation of the English nation. She counted neither sacrifices, revolutions, nor centuries. Because, in this instance—and succeeding ages were destined to prove it — she was making a diamond.
الصفحة 30 - ... traiteur is his property. You drink Bordeaux at twenty-five sous the litre, and he knows it ; and it is only when you have friends, you go even as far as Beaune. The fowls are too dear in the market to-day for Madame ; the cook has told him so with a toss of the head ; and he holds that you are bien pen de chose. A friend out at elbows has paid you a visit ; and went out arm-in-arm with you, and tu-toied you. The landlord has called three times for his rent. It is the privilege of the concierge...

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