The Complete Angler [and] the Lives of Donne, Wotton, Hooker, Herbert and Sanderson

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Macmillan, 1901 - 497 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 221 - Others to sin, and made my sin their door .Wilt thou forgive that sin which I did shun A year or two, but wallowed in a score ? When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more. I have a sin of fear, that when I've spun My last thread, I shall perish on the shore : But swear by thyself, that at my death thy Son Shall shine as he shines now, and heretofore ; And having done that, thou hast done, I fear no more.
الصفحة 86 - ... hear the birds sing, and possess ourselves in as much quietness as these silent silver streams, which we now see glide so quietly by us. Indeed, my good scholar, we may say of angling as Dr. Boteler said of strawberries, " Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did...
الصفحة 58 - As I left this place, and entered into the next field, a second pleasure entertained me' 'twas a handsome milkmaid that had not yet attained so much age and wisdom as to load her mind with any fears of many things that will never be, as too many men too often do; but she cast away all care, and sung like a nightingale.
الصفحة v - The Compleat Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation. BEING A DISCOURSE OF FISH AND FISHING not unworthy the perusal of most Anglers. Simon Peter said, I go a fishing : and they said, we also -will go with thee.
الصفحة 409 - And when one of the company told him he had disparaged himself by so dirty an employment, his answer was that the thought of what he had done would prove music to him at midnight ; and that the omission of it would have upbraided and made discord in his conscience whensoever he should pass by that place — " For if I be bound to pray for all that be in distress, I am sure that I am bound, so far as it is in my power, to practice what I pray for.
الصفحة 60 - Slippers, lined choicely for the cold, With buckles of the purest gold. A belt of straw, and ivy buds, With coral clasps, and amber studs; And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me, and be my love.
الصفحة 61 - The flowers do fade, and wanton fields To wayward winter reckoning yields: A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall.
الصفحة 38 - Let me live harmlessly, and near the brink Of Trent or Avon have a dwelling-place, Where I may see my quill, or cork, down sink. With eager bite of pike, or bleak, or dace ; And on the world and my Creator think : Whilst some men strive ill-gotten goods t' embrace ; And others spend their time in base excess Of wine, or worse, in war, or wantonness.
الصفحة 206 - Our two souls therefore, which are one, Though I must go, endure not yet A breach, but an expansion, Like gold to airy thinness beat. If they be two, they are two so As stiff twin compasses are two; Thy soul, the fix'd foot, makes no show To move, but doth, if th
الصفحة 87 - And raise my low-pitched thoughts above Earth, or what poor mortals love : Thus, free from lawsuits, and the noise Of princes' courts, I would rejoice. Or, with my Bryan and a book, Loiter long days near Shawford brook.

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