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Jeremiah, his complaints against them 347

his weapons, his courtiers, his re-
Jews, their hardness and opprobrium inferred

wards

i 180
from the various methods Jesus Christ his kingdom not being of this world, de-
adopted for their conversion i 164

monstrates the authenticity of his
we should have a little patience with

mission

184
their prejudices

183 a search for the subjects of the Mes-
the Jews safer guides to prophecy than

siah's kingdom among the Jews, in
some Christians,—(perhaps the author

Rome, in Protestant countries 185
alludes to Grotius, who affected an in this point the faith and practice of
unpardonable singularity in his expo-

Christians are at dissonance 186
sitions of the prophecies,)

187 of heaven, meaning of the expression
could they be persuaded though one

ji 401
rose from the dead

202 Knowledge, the imperfection of it, no proof
two answers

ib.

of the non-existence of God, and
their fair promises before Sinai were

of divine truth

i 94
transient

ii 82

defects of human knowledge
six of their calamities deplored by

ii 203
Ezekiel

365

five reasons why our knowledge
character of their apostate kings 367

is circumscribed

360
the Jews perished as the Galileans

man cannot know as God knows,
381

which is an adequate apology
the calamities of the Jews and those

for the mysteries of faith 362
of Europe, compared

ib.
John and Mary, address of Christ to ii 417

L
Judas went to his own place
ii 109 Latitudinarianism, or Deism

ii 359
it were better that he had not been born, Law, offending in one point, &c. refers to ca-
in four arguments

ib. pital offences, not to daily frailties, mo-
the circumstances in which he sinned mentary faults and involuntary pas-

113
sions

i 352
the pleas with which he covered his it refers to wilful and presumptuous sins,
crime

ib.

which virtually sap the foundation of
the confession extorted by his conscience

the whole law in three respects 354
114

the law requires us to consider God as a
Judgment, the day of

i 53

sovereign, a legislator, and a father ib.
power of the judge

54 the excellent design of God's law in
a future judgment is inferred from four arguments

381
disorders of society, from the Lawyers, their method of false pleading ii 73
power of conscience, and from Learning and knowledge should be acquired
revelation

322
by Christians

i 219
we shall be judged according to the Legends, a specimen of them

ji 140
dispensations under which we Lent, apparently observed with great reve-
lived

325,

rence by the author's hearers i 187
these are light, proportion or ta- this festival is strongly recommended
lents
ib.

ii 164
and mercy

326, &c. Levitical law supported by three classes of
Judgments (national,) the erroneous and the

persons

ï 219
just light in which they should be Libertines, their objections against revelation
viewed
ii 378, &c.

i 52
four erroneous dispositions in which

refuted in four arguments ib.
they are viewed ib. &c. Liberty, (Christian) described

i 270
God is not only the author of all Liberty described in five points: in the power

judgments, but he determines of suspending the judgment, in having
their ends in three respects 379

the will in unison with the under
a provisional or particular judg-

standing, the conscience superior to
ment on every man as soon as

the control of the senses, superior
his soul leaves the body i 321

to our condition in life i 268
the judgment or opinion must Liberty is incompatible with sin

269
often be suspended ii 76 Life, arguments on its shortness and uncer-
Justification, Anselm's mode of expressing on tainty

ji 215
that subject

i 301 the life of men divided into six periods
Justification by faith
299

214
this life is a season of probation assign-
K

ed for making our choice 215

the grand object of life is to prepare for
Keduscha Kadytis, or holy, the name of Jeru-

eternity

216
salem in many of the ori- sinners should be grateful for the re-
ental languages ii 364 prieve of life

ib.
King, the term defined

ji 18 life well spent affords satisfaction to old
responsible

343
age

i 289
The kingdom of Christ is not of this an idle life, however exempt from gross-

world, as is apparent from his design, er crime, is incompatible with a state
his maxims, his marvellous works,

371

of salvation

Life, the viscissitudes of life

ii 59 | Marlborough, (Duke of) his victory over
reflections on it

63
Marshal Villars

ii 89
we should value the good things of life ib. Martyrs, a fine apostrophe to them i 123
some men hate life, through a disposi-

the Jews believed in their resurrec-
tion of melancholy

65
tion

158
through a principle of misanthropy 66

the moral martyrs are sometimes ac-
through discontent and disgust ib.

cused of rebellion

ii 19
and through an excessive fondness of

they have a fourfold reward 21
life

ib.

arguments of support to martyrs 13
rectitude and delicacy of conscience pro-

the fear of martyrdom

320
mote disgust of life
69 Mary, the mother of Christ

ji 421
Live, how shall we, the expression beautifully Marvellous, the, a caution against it ji 182
applied
ii 417 Materiality of the soul refuted

i 261
Louis XIV, a cruel, superstitious and enthu- Maxims of the world

ii 31
siastic man

i 389 | Mediator, Christ in this office is one with God
his monarchy obviously alluded

in three respects

ii 157
to

391 Merchants, apprised of a heavenly treasure
his secret policy against the

ji 217
neighbouring states 395 Messiah, a comfort to the church under the
his glory, and the humiliation of

idea of the Jewish captivity i 76
bis pride

ii 108 Metaphysical mode of reasoning, concerning
Love, the energy of the love of Christ i 291

spirit and matter

i 58
the sinner is exhorted to enkindle his Ministers or casuists, cautioned ii 50. 71. 107
heart with love

292

humility must be their character 93
effects of Christ's love on the heart 294

St. Paul divides them into three
his love is an inexhaustible source of

classes

ib.
consolation in all the distresses of

their glory in the day of the Lord 97
life, and in the agonies of death 295 Ministers should be distinguished by love 151
it is a source of universal obedience ib.

an address to them

217
Love to God described

371

their duty when attending profli-

gate men in their last moments
M

249

woe, woe to the faithless ministry
Machiavelian politics
i 396. ii 350

259
portrait of the infidel who shall Ministers must strike at vice without respect
presume to govern a king-

to persons

295
dom on those principles 367 Ministry, the little success of Christ's ministry
Magistrates addressed

ii 217

accounted for by five considera-
Mahomet, character of that monster ü 355

tions

i 166
Maimonides, this learned Rabbi agrees with

the christian ministry excites digni-
St. Paul, Rom. xii. 2. that God

fied enemies

177
requires our persons, not our

attendance on it must make us
sacrifices

i 288
either better or worso

386
Malachi, character of the people to whom he

it was greatly abused by the Jews
preached
ii 192

ii 8
and the character of the priests 196

a striking transition from preaching
Malebranche, his admirable exposition of the

the most tremendous terrors, to
passions

ii 73

the ministry of consolation ii 250
Man, in the simplicity of youth admires the

an apology for the ministry of ter.
perfections of God, and the theory of

ror to certain characters

224
religion

ii 278 Miracles were performed in the most public
man is born with a propensity to vice

place and before the most compe-
281
tent judges

i 197
the dangers to which a well disposed

the folly of asking miracles while we
man is exposed to in public life 285

live in sin

209
his faculty of thinking, loving and feel- Miser, a, his reflections at a funeral but tran-
ing, demonstrate the limits of his

sient

i 208
mind

360 Molinists, an opinion of theirs censured ii 7
wants of

402 Montausier (Mons. de) his confession i 405
Mankind, the wisdom of God in the diversity Morality, its principle, the love of God is
of their conditions

i 252

always the same, its variations
they are all equal in natural pow-

therefore are simply the effect of
ers and infirmities

253
superior light

i 324
in privilege, and claims on God

the nature, obligations and motives
and providence

254

of morality i pref. xxxv
in the designations of the Creator

it has five characters: it is clearly
according to their endowments

revealed

18
255

it is distinguished by dignity of
in their doom to suffer and die 256

principle

19
our lot in life, and our faculties

by equity of claims

ib.
prove our designation for another

by being within our reach 21
world

ii 61

and by the power of its motives 22

Morality, the morality of a soldier, of a states- | Origen, his avowal of the Godhead of Christ
man, of a merchant, of a minis-

i 280
ter

i 397
his ideas of hell

335
Moral evidences, its difference from mathe- Original sin, or seed of corruption, attributed
matical

ii 183

to the depravity of nature i 215
Moses, his advantage as a preacher
i 56

ji 281. 397
he is the reputed author of the scth

it is hostile to truth and virtue 424
Psalm

ii 210

it disorders the soul with unholy dis-
the multitude bad guides in faith ii 28

positions

ib.
in worship

29

the depravity of nature is increased
in morality

30
by acts of vice

417
in dying

32

it descends from parents to children,
Murrain of the cattle in Holland ii 349

and therefore is a strong argument
Mysteries render a religion doubtful in four

for diligence in education 23
respects
ii 355 Orobio, (Isaac) a learned Jew

i 184
Mysteries of Mahometism, of popery, of pa-
ganism, of infidelity, contrasted with

P
Christianity

ib. Pagans, their belief in the presence of the

gods at their festivals, largely
N

illustrated

ii 194

their major and their minor myste-
Nations cautioned against placing an ultimate

ries too abominable for description
reliance on fleets and armies i 126

358
Nations are regarded as one body, in the visi- Papists, their uncharitableness in denying sal-

tation
of the iniquities of our fathers

vation to all Christians out of their
i 108
communion

i 375
National dangers should especially affect those they cannot be saved as idolaters 376
who are most exposed

387

they are guilty of adoring the host,
Nativity of Christ, all nature rejoicing at his

&c.

ib.
birth

i 149

they are but a novel people, compared
Nature and grace abound with marvels i 93

with the primitive Christians ii 28
the study of it unsearchably sublime their preachers censured

96
ii 100 Pardon, promises of it to various classes of
Natural religion, the disciple of it embarrassed

sinners

ii 94
on contemplating the miseries of Parents cautioned how to look on their chil-
man, &c. but all these are no diffi-

dren

ii 217
culties to the disciple of revealed Party spirit, the dangers of it

i 44
religion

i 213 Paul, (St.) he kept his body under for the
the disciple of natural religion, is

race and the fight

ii 12
equally embarrassed in studying an eulogium on his character 13
the nature of man in three respects the time of his rapture into the third

214
heaven

ii 200
the disciple of natural, and the disci- the transports of his rapture 201

ple of revealed religion, at the tri- the obscurity of some parts of his writ-
bunal of God, soliciting pardon 216

ings arise for the want of historic
fortifying themselves against the fear

reference

219
of death

217 he preached Christ at the tribunals
the confusion of Pagan philosophers,

where he was prosecuted for
respecting natural religion, in four

preaching him

293
respects

218 he selected three subjects of discourse
Nebuchadnezzar, the rapidity of his conquest

before Felix, calculated to convert
i 68
that prince

ib.
Nehemas, (Rabbi) his curious reply to a Ro- court preachers contrasted with St.
man Consul, who had inquired con-

Paul, in a striking apostrophe to
cerning the name of God i 328

the dignitaries of the church, who
Nicodemites described

ji 406

surround the person of Louis XIV.
Night, a christian seeking for the evidence of

294
religion, is placed between the night he is a model for preachers 299
of historic difficulties, and the night Passion, a lawless, favourite passion dangerous
of his future hopes

ii 173
to the soul

i 357
the faith which respects the night of the passions defined

ü 72
futurity

179

they war against the mind 74
Nineveh, the fall of that metropolis 361

and against reason

76
Nobility of birth extravagantly panegyrized the disorders they excite in the ima-

ii 343

gination, exceed those excited in
a virtuous descent, the highest no-

the seasons

75
bility

ib.

erroneous inferences from the pasa
sions

ib.
0

remedies of passion described 77

philosophical advice for subduing
Opinions of the fathers respecting the salva-

them, is to avoid idleness and use
tion of certain heathens i 220

mortification

78

severance

rance

zar

Passion, an apostrophe to grace for power | Piety, it is incompatible with the whole de-
over passion

ii 82
sign of religion

88
the illusive happiness acquired by the it renders God's promises to us doubt-
passions

347
ful

ib.
Perfection, the highest attainable in this life, is it is imprudent

ib.
to know death, and not fear it Piety of taste and sentiment defined 384

ii 225

the judgment we form of our state un-
Perseverance, men must be saints before we

der privations

385
exhort them to persevere when privation is general, it indicates

ii 271
an unregenerate state

387
we cannot be saved without per- Pilate, the baseness of his conduct i 173

274

his cruelty to the Galileans ii 377
the scripture characters founded Plato, a sketch of his republic

ii 278
their assurance on persevering Plato's opinion of God

i 57
to the end

ib. Plague, an argument for fasting and humilia-
a caveat against unqualified per-

tion

ii 349
severance

275

national plagues sevenfold 352
an address to carnal men, who appalling horrors of the plague 354

hold this doctrine 276 Pleasure, mischiefs arising from unlawful in-
to visionary men

277
dulgences

i 47. 78
to sincere people

ib. Politeness, as practised by bad men ji 19
models, or examples of perseve- Poor, (the) a fine series of arguments in beg-
280 ging for them

i 409
Pentecost, the glories of the day ii 307. i 194 Pope, his kingdom compared with Christ's i 185
Persecution, the agents of it fulfil the pleasure Popery, sketch of its corruptions, pref. i 5. 205
of the Almighty
i 124

(see Papists)
a pathetic contrast between the Poverty, God who quickeneth and arranges all
persecution of the French Pro-

things, often leaves his best servants
testants, and the sufferings of

in indigence and want i 180
the Jews, on the destruction Prayer, a source of consolation ii 152
of their city, by Nebuchadnez- Preachers, the liberty of the French exiles in

ii 365
that respect

ii 84
Petavius, the Semi-Arian, refuted by Bishop Preachers, (the primitive) an admirable ad-
Bull

i 277

vantage in addressing the heathen
Peter, (St.) his confession of faith i 260

and the Jews

i 197
his sermon on the day of Pentecost pos- Predestination, the impossibility of explaining
sessed five excellencies

195

it; but God, who cannot err,
a fine specimen of what he would say,

declares that he offers violence
were he to fill a pulpit

200

to no creature, and that our
his feelings at the transfiguration ii 207

destruction proceeds from our-
his attachment to the Levitical law 219

selves

ii 116
six circumstances aggravate his fall 321 Princes and judges, their qualifications ii 344

the nature of his repentance 323 Principle, purity of principle must be the ba-
Phalaris, his cruelty

i 87
sis of all our conduct

ii 4
Pharisees, their hypocrisy traced ii 36 Prophecy, objections against it answered; its
Philo had a notion of the Trinity i 222

character asserted i 152, &c.
Philosophers, their presumption

i 78

difficulties of affixing a literal
their ancient errors

175

meaning to the prophecies of the
their prejudices against the gos-

Messiah and his kingdom i 183
pel unreasonable 206 Prophecies respecting the fall of Jerusalem
Philosophical apathy, a great evil ji 348

ii 149
Piety, its excellence

i 55 Prophecies respecting Christ's death, accom-
it is distinguished by knowledge, since-

plished by his sufferings 169
rity, sacrifice and zeal ii 35, &c. Prophets, how they conducted themselves at
Piety is productive of health

38
courts

i 399
of reputation

ib. Prophetic eloquence, its superiority i 379
of fortune

39 Professional men, the conditions of their sal-
of happiness

ib.
vation

ii 57
ib. Protestants of France distinguished by their
of confidence in death

ib.

attendance on public worship,
the piety of Ephraim and Judah tran-

and on the days of communion
sient
84

i 167
so is the piety excited by public calami-

the exiles are exhorted to pray for
ties

ib.

the restoration of their churches
by religious festivals
85

ii 97
by the fear of death

86

the faith of a Protestant 256
transient piety implies a great want of

the abject situation of those who
allegiance to God as a king ib.

remained in France 289
exemplified by Ahab

87

an address to French Protestants
it implies an absurdity of character ib.

368, &c.
it is an action of life perverted by a re-

the care of Providence over them
turn to folly

ib.
in exile

366

of peace

ib.

383

men

ib.

XV

000 persons

Proverbs of Solomon, some of them reconciled | Reformation, the reformed obtain the free ex.
with his assertions in his Ecclesi-

ercise of religion

ib.
astes

ii 69

the massacre of Paris cruelly
Providence, asserted

i 75

plotted under a marriage with
complaints against it answered

Henry of Navarre
382

Guise attempts to dethrone
complaints against its severity

Henry III. by a league xi
refuted

Henry IV. of Navarre, embraces
the doctrine of Providence should

popery, and

ascends the
operate on public bodies of

throno

xii
392
the edict of Nantes

ib.
examples of Providenco over na-

the Jesuits founded by Loyola,
tions

393

no doubt with good intentions,
mysteries of Providence in the

at first, confounded by Riche-
succession of Henry VIIIth of

lieu with the Protestants xiii
England, from the Roman Pon.

Louis XIII. persecutes the Pro-
tiff; in the singular success of

testants by Richelieu's advice
Zuinglius; in the courage of
Luther

ii 102

the final revocation of the edict
Christians often reason ill con-

of Nantes
cerning Providence 338

the horrors and the exile of 800,
six marks of God's mercy and

xvi
care of good men, when Jeru-

this persecution uniformly
salem was destroyed by the

charged on the French clergy;
Chaldeans

368

its impolicy exposed in forty
the same care over the persecut-

arguments

xvii
ed Protestant exiles

ib.

the glory of Louis XIV. waned
Providence has, after one hundred years, an-

from that period

ib.
swered our author's question in Regeneration, character of it

i 315
the affirmative, viz: whether the

(see Holiness)
exile of the Jews and that of

its nature laid down in a
the Protestants, should come to

change of ideas, a change of
a similar close

369

desires, a change of taste, a
Pure (the) all things are pure to them

ii 7

change of hopes, a change
Purgatory, unsupported by scripture ii 96

of pursuits

ii 393
Pyrrhonianism

ii 359
its necessity

401
Q

the necessity of regeneration

demonstrated by the genius
Quintus Curtius, his prayer before Carthage

of religion, the wants of man,
i i 69

and the perfections of God ib.
R

Religion, progressive in five classes of argu-
ments

ji 13. 16
Rabbins, their extraordinary assumptions over

its evidences were stronger to the
the conscience of the people i 166

scripture characters than to us
Recapitulation of a sermon, fine specimens of it

ii 181
i 342. ii 172. 265 Repentance, some have too much and some
Redemption, the harmony of the divine attri-

too little sorrow for sin i 97
butes in this work, as asserted

possibility of a death bed repent-
Psal. xi. Heb. X. 6. Mic. vi. 6,

ance proved by six arguments
7. I Cor. ii. 9
i 96

103
three mysteries of redemption

difficulties of a death bed repent-

'
not discovered by reason
ib.

104
Redemption of the soul

264

character of national repentance
Reformation, the necessity of it
iv

110
the Reformation in France-

the penitential reflections of a
Charles VIII. persecuted the

sinner

113
reformed at Rome, and pro- Repentance of a godly sort has sin for its ob-
tected them in Germany vi

ject
it very much increased under

it is augmented by reflecting on
Henry II

vii

the number, the enormity, and
the house of Bourbon declare

the fatal influence of sin 307
for the reform, and the house

exhortation to repentance

312
de Guise for the Catholics ib. Repentance described

372. ii 13
the king of Navarre allured by

a powerful exhortation to repent-
new promises, desert the Pro-

51
testant cause

ix

specimen of a death bed repent-
but the queen of Navarre be-

114
comes its most zealous advo-

a series of difficulties attendant
cate

ib.

on a death bed repentance 247
the duke de Guise commences

three objections answered 246
a war with the Protestants,

two prejudices against a protract-
and 50,000 of them are slain x

ed repentanco

268

ance

306

ance

ance

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