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GENERAL INDEX.

Repentance, a powerful exhortation to repent- | Rome, Christian, her cruelties to the Protes-
ance

269
tants

i 240
Reprobation not absolute; but may be advert- subterranean Rome, a book of that
ed

ii 116
title

ii 70
Restitution required

i 363 Romans, the scope of the epistle to them,
so Judas did

ii 114
stated

ii 99
Resurrection of Christ, the evidences of it di-
vided into three classes; presump-

S
tions, proofs, demonstrations

i 187 Sabbath day, punishment threatened for pro-
eight considerations give full

faning it

ii 370
weight to the evidence of the

the difference of the sabbath with re-
apostles

188

gard to the Jews and the Christians
Christ's resurrection demonstrat-

ib.
ed by the gifts conferred on

the origin of the sabbath to demon-
the apostles, and by the same

strate the origin of the world, and
gifts which they conferred on

that God was its creator 371
others

189
to prevent idolatry

ib.
if all these evidences be untrue,

to promote humanity

ib.
.all those who wrought mira-

to equalize all men in devotion 372
cles must be taxed with im-

the change of the sabbath from the
posture; all the enemies of

seventh, to the first day of the
Christianity must be taxed

week

374
with imbecility; and the whole

reasons why the sabbath is binding
multitude which embraced

on the Christian church ib.
Christianity, must be blamed

scandalous profanation of the sabbath
for an extravagance unknown

in Holland

375, &c.
to society

190

an apostrophe to the poor Protestants,
the joy of Christ justified by four

who profane the sabbath in mysti-
considerations

191
cal Babylon

376
presumptions, proofs, demon- Sacrament, a fine invitation to it

i 85
strations of it

ii 175

an awful charge not to neglect it
the evidences of Christ's resur-

193
rection has eight distinct cha-

believers invited to it with a view
racters

ib.

of acquiring strength to van-
the faith in testimony worthy of

quish Satan, and to conquer
credit, is distinguished from

death

228
the faith extorted by tyranny

a caution to participate of it with
ib.
sanctity

297
from the faith of the enthusiast

it is often profaned by temporiz-
176

ing communicants ii 85
from the faith of superstition 177

it is a striking obligation to holi-
Resurrection of saints at Christ's death 167

172
the resurrection at his second

a sacramental address

190
coming

336

parallel between the Lord's table,
Revelation has a sufficiency of evidence in re-

and the table of shew bread in
gard to the five classes of unbe-

the temple

193
lievers

i 202

it is polluted by the want of light,
its doctrines lie within the reach

of virtue, and of religious fer-
of the narrowest capacities 203

196
it was gradually conferred accord-

strictures on a precipitate prepa-
ing to the situation and capaci-

ration for it

198
ty of the age

344

addresses of consolation to the do-
Revenge, the purpose of it incompatible with

vout communicant

199
a state of salvation

i 356

God is present at the sacrament
Rhetoric, oriental

i 423
as on mount Sinai

303
Rich man, (the) apparently taxing providence

a striking address to those who
with the inadequacy of former

neglect it

ib.
means, by soliciting a new mean

it is a covenant with God 301, &c.
for the conversion of his brethren

307, &c.
i 201 Sacred writers, their talents, which God
Riches often increase profligacy ii 19

seems to have conferred as though
when suddenly acquired they almost

riches and power were too mean
turn a man's brain
346

i 65
Righteous, be not righteous over-much ji 7

their style possessed every beauty ib.
Righteousness, the word explained i 298

they delighted to absorb their soul in
it exalteth a nation 389

the contemplation of God 95
five limits of the expression, Sacred writings, Saurin had an elegant me-
righteousness or religion ex-

thod of quoting from them, as is ap-
alteth a nation
ib.

ii 146
it promotes every object of difficulties of expounding them 334
civil society

390 | Sacrifices, (see atonement)

ness

vour

to give

parent from

six ways

xiv

GENERAL INDEX.
Sacrifices, they passed between the parts of

their momentary defects, and their
ihe victims

ii 306

illustrious virtues üi 279
Sailors, character of their repentance ii 268 Seal, (see Holy Spirit)

ji 808
Saints, their employment in heaven ii 125 Self-examination, the method of it

ii 186
the sights presented to the saints after Simeon, (Luke ii.) three characters of his piety
death
144

ii 141
they have sighed for immortality and Simeon the Pharisee, four defects in his opi-
a better state of the church 145

nion of Christ

ii 46
their happiness in heaven in regard of Slander, the sinfulness of it

i 386
knowledge

203 Septuagint version, a sketch of its history i 295
of propensity

205 Sinai, its terrors expressive of our Saviour's
of sensible pleasure

206
agony

ii 306
what sentiments the ancient saints en- Sin and its punishment are connected ii 350
tertained of themselves when under the folly of it

i 78
a cloud
274 its effects

84
danger of presumptive thoughts 275 its atrocity when wilful

354
there is a similarity between us and the motives to sin incomparably weaker
the ancient saints in five respects than the motives to virtue

308
281, &c.
little sin conducive of great crimes

367
their high vocation

282

the apology of those who charge sin upon
why the saints are still subject to their constitution, not admissible ii 77
death

340 Sin causes three sorts of tears to be shed 323
Saladin, exposed his shroud to the army the sin or blasphemy against the Holy

i 263
Ghost

328
Sanctification, sin of opposing it ii 312 the sin unto death, as stated by St. John
(see Regeneration and Holiness)

329
Satan, his victories often ruinous to his king- inquiry concerning this sin may proceed
dom

i 76 from the melancholy, the timorous,
he seeks to seduce us from the truth and the wilful apostates

330
142 Sinner, hardened and impenitent i 208
he assails the Christian four ways; by Sinners abuse the long-suffering of God, in

the illusive maxims of the world, by the disposition of a devil, a beast,
the pernicious example of the multi-

a philosopher and a man illi
tude, by threatenings and persecu- they reason in a reproachful manner
tion, and by the attractions of sensu-

in regard to their love of esteem,
al pleasure

145

and honour, and pleasure, and ab-
his power is borrowed; limited in dura-

horrence of restraint

226
tion, in degree; and whatever desire Sinners are slaves in five respects 269
he may have to destroy us, it cannot they must live to expiate their crimes
equal the desire of God to save us

271
227

they must glory in Christ alone, but
his design is to render man unlike his

add watchfulness to their future
Maker

332
conduct

i 302
he is the most irregular and miserable Sinners must not be misguided by the multi-
of all beings

370
tude

ii 33
Saturnalia of the Romans, its origin îi 372 their complaints of the severity of
Saul, the king, his consecration accompanied

God's law, refuted in five argu-
by the spirit

ii 391
ments

i 381
Saurin, his life, born at Nismes, escapes with their best wisdom is to avoid the ob-
his father to Geneva

i xvii
jects of their passions

ii 77
becomes an ensign in Lord Gallo-

the aggravating characters of their
way's regiment, which then served

sin

122
in Switzerland; but on the peace we should weep for them, because of
with France he returned to his stu-

our connexions with them 124
dies, and preferred the ministry ib. are very great scourges to society 125
preaches five years in London xviii Sinners under the gospel, offend against supe-
character of his preaching

ib.
rior light

263
he settles at the Hague

ib.
against superior motives

ib.
is noticed by the Princess of Wales, against the example of scripture cha-
afterward queen Caroline, to whom

racters, who do not continue in sin
his son dedicated his posthumous

till the end of life

264
sermons

ib.

against the virtues of those converts ib.
his ministry was attended by princes, and sinners who delay conversion to
magistrates, generals and scientific

the close of life cannot adduce equal
men; his courage in reproving 386

evidence of their conversion 265
Schem, (Rabbi) his contrast between the tem- Smuggling and defrauding the revenue, cen-
ple and the palaces of princes i 193

sured

i 355
Schoolmen, many of their errors proceeded Society cannot subsist without religion, de-

from monastic habits, illustrated monstrated in five arguments i 230
by the doctrine of reprobation the transition of society from simpli-

i 100

city of manners, to a style of living
Scripture characters, the distinction between

injurious to charity

421

193

old age

Socinius, his system refuted

ii 102

T
Sodom, its abominable sin a proof of God's
long-suffering

i 107 | Table (the) of the Lord, Mal. i. 6, 7. ii 192
Soldiers reproved

i 78 the table of shew bread, &c.
Solomon, his great wisdom when a child ii 342 Talmud of the Jews, and the Romish missals
his dream in Gibeon

ib.
compared

i 164
his recollection of past mercies 343 Teachers are of three classes

i 44
the aspect under which he considers

caution in the choice of teachers ib.
the regal dignity

ib.

parents warned not to train unre-
conjecture concerning his age when

generate children for the minis-
called to the throne

344
try

46
his preference of wisdom to wealth

the policy of some tenet teachers in
345, &c.
Galatia

ii 219
his fall demonstrates the difficul- Temptations, the ancient saints resembled us
ties attendant on splendid talent

in these

ii 282. 287
346

a double shield against tempta-
the dangers of bad company,

ib.
tions

290
the dangers of human grandeur ib.

six temptations from infancy to
the beguiling. charms of pleasure

ib.
347 Terror, the utility of preaching it; an augur
his situation and experience quali- of what sort of sermons the apostles
fied him to be a moralist 62

would make, were they to see our
he introduces different speakers into

lives

i 198
his book of Ecclesiastes, as the it promotes repentance by the uncer-
epicure, the fool, &c. which ac-

tainty of salvation

308
count for the dissonance of senti- Tertullian's avowal of the Godhead of Christ
ments in that book
65

i 280
his hatred of life explained ib. The Holy Spirit superior in his operations to
two classes of phantoms seduced his the suggestions of Satan i 227
generous heart

67 his aids are promised to the ministry, &c.
absurdities of the schoolmen con-

291
cerning his wisdom

ib. the higher endowments of the Holy Spi-
Son, Christ the essential and eternal i 277 rit, were restored on the coming of the
Sorrow, six effects of godly sorrow 309

Messiah

ii 143
no sorrow like that of the disciples for he requires men to correspond with the
their master

ii 151

efforts of grace in their conversion 253
Sorrow allowed for the death of friends 337 the anointing, the seal, and earnest of the
Soul, (the) its excellence inferred from the Spirit

308
efforts of Satan to enslave it i 148 his

agency on the heart

310
its immortality hoped by the heathens, he communicates the foretastes of heaven
and asserted by the gospel 216

312, &c.
its intelligence asserted in five argu- Thief on the cross, his case strikingly illus-
ments

259
trated

ü 264
its immortality demonstrated 261 Thomas, the difference of his faith from ours
its value inferred from the price of re-

ii 178
demption
263 Time lost, or misapproved

ii 211
the partisans for the sleeping and anni- much of our time is lost in lassitude 213
hilation of the soul, refuted 335

and in the cares of this life

214
its essence, operations and union with Timothy, St. Paul's love to him i 179
the body, inscrutable
ii 101 Tithes of three kinds

i 358
its immortality farther and strongly pre- Tongues, the gift of tongues on the day of
sumed

214

Pentecost, had three excellencies
an immortal spirit should have but a

i 196
transient regard for transient good 215 Transubstantiation, its absurdities 167
Spinoza, the absurdities of the system he re-

it is admirably refuted
vived
i 66

191
Spirit, a doubt whether all that is in the uni- Trinity, the personality of the Father, Son,
verse be reducible to matter and spirit

and Holy Spirit, asserted in refuta-
i 73

tion of Arianism ii 309, &c. i 90
Statesmen reproved

i 78 Trinity, demonstrated by Philo i 222
amenable to the divine laws

the doctrine stated, and defended
Stoical obstinacy, a specimen of it in Zeno ii 56

ii 357. 394
Study, its difficulties for want of means ii 67 advantages of this doctrine 359
Swearing, the sinfulness of it

i 407 Truths, their connexion is a high argument
Superstitious conclusions, caveats against them

in favour of revelation i 42
ii 350

this connexion should induce minis-
details

419

ters to pursue a regular system 44
Suprala psarians, censured for denying salva- Pilate's question, What is truth? 132
tion to sincere heathens

it might refer to the Messiah, or to
i 219

the truth which the heathens
their system refuted in five

sought

182
arguments

truth defined, and its price 133

ij 105

377

spects

xvi

GENERAL INDEX.
Truth, seven rules to direct our researches | Upright, (the) their praise is wise, real, hum-
after truth

134

ble and magnanimous i 130
prejudices are highly obstructive in
the acquisition of truth 136

V
the word of truth exemplified in the

pleasure it affords in qualifying us Vanini, an avowed Atheist, burnt at Toulouse
to fill our stations in life, in exempt- by sentence of Parliament ii 100
ing us from unreasonable doubts, Vanity of opposing God, in four respects ii 53
in fortifying us against the

ap-

a caution against opposing God 57
proaches of death

138 Victims, ten imperfections of them in the au-
the radiance of truth is superior to

thor's dissertations

ii 192
the glimmerings of error 224 Veil, in the temple rent

îi 166
sell not the truth; that is, do not lose Virgin Mary, intercession of

ii 420
the aptitude of the mind to truth Virtue, the motives to it are superior to the

236
motives to vice

i 226
do not make a mercenary use of it five characters of the superior virtues
237

369
do not betray it

ib. Virtues of eternal obligation, as charity, &c.
this may be done by the adulation of

are of greater.weight than temporary
a courtier

ib.
virtues

360
by the zealot who defends a point the object of virtues vary their im-
with specious arguments 238

portance

361
by apostacy or by temporizing 239

it is the same with regard to the in-
by perverting judgment in five re-

fluence of virtues

ib.
241

the end and design of virtues aug-
by tergiversation in politics 242

ment their importance 362
by withholding reproof in the pulpit, the virtues of worldly men are very
in private, and in visits to the sick

defective

i 31
243

the virtues of carnal men are often
Truths which have a high degree of evidence,

but the tinsel of their crimes 32
should be admitted as demonstrated

complaints on the impotency of men
ii 361

to practice virtue, answered in four
Tyrants, their conduct in persecuting the

respects

119, &c.
church

i 176

every virtue exhibited in the death of
they are justly censured 322

Christ

170
they are deaf to the glory of oppres- harmony between happiness and vir-
ii 30

350
reflections for a tyrant and infidel Vision, the beatific

i 327, &c.
53 Voice of the rod

ii 347
Voorburgh, the weeping and rejoicing at the
U

consecration of the French church

ü 363
Unbeliever, (the) his taste, which is low and
brutish
i 229

W
his polities disturb society

230
his indocile and haughty temper War, a reference to Louis XIVth, and others
231

i 322
his unfounded logic

232 its deplorable effects i 396. ü 89
his consequent line of morals 233 Ways of God, ways of light, justice and com-
his efforts to extinguish con- passion

ii 412
science

234 Ways of men, ways of darkness, blasphemy
he piques himself on politeness, and despair

îi 412
which is applauded by the Whiston censured for obtruding the apostoli-
world: yet an apology may be

cal constitutions as genuine

i 279
made for the unbeliever, which will, the difference between the efficiency of
cannot be made for the man

the Creator's and the creature's will
who holds the truth in sin ib.

i 120
Unbelievers, their demands of farther evi- the perfection of the will and sensibility
dence unreasonable 235

i 260
they are divided into five classes Wisdom of the world, and the foolishness of

202
God explained

i 212
their folly in asking a new mi-

St. Paul's divine wisdom in the sea
racle

207

lection of arguments, when writ-
an unbeliever dying in uncer-

ing to the Hebrews
tainty, pathetically described | Witness of the Spirit, (the direct) i 917

see Assurance, and

ii 188
Union of children with the sin of their fathers

see also a note by the translators 986
in four respects
i 109 Woman, the unchaste

ii 48
Unpardonable sin against the Holy Ghost, she is distinguished from Mary of
opinions concerning it ii 327

Bethany, and from Mary Magda-
Unregenerate, (the) faithfully warned i 104

lene

ib.
a serious address to them ii 292

her repentance had four characters ib.

sion

tue

210

282

Woman, a disputation whether her love was Worldly minded men faithfully warned i 263.
the cause or the effect of her par

ii 163
don

48 Whether the apostles were ignorant of their
Wood, hay and stubble, are expressive of

living to the end of the world 336
light doctrines

ii 97

excellence of the world to come i 55
World, the vanity of the

i 54 Works, good works cannot merit heaven i 300
its insufficiency to satisfy the soul 147 good works must of necessity be con-
this world is not the place of felicity

nected with faith as the fruits ib.
179

five objections to the contrary, abls
its draws us off from truth and virtue

answered

301
428 Wormwood and gall, a metaphor 305
vanity of worldly policy in attempt-
ing to govern nations by the max-

Z
ims of infidelity, rather than those
of religion

ii 54 | Zacharias, son of Barachiah or Jehoida, the
the instability of all worldly good 62

high priest, with other conjectures
the Christian is crucified to the world

i 106
220 Zeal exemplified from prophets ü 87
the degrees and difficulties of it 221 | Zuinglius, (Suingle) the Swiss reformer ii 102

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