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sinners

Morality, the morality of a soldier, of a states- | Origen, his avowal of the Godhead of Christ
man, of a merchant, of a minis-

i 280
ter

i 397
his ideas of hell

335
Moral evidences, its difference from mathe- Original sin, or seed of corruption, attributed
matical

ii 183

to the depravity of nature i 215
Moses, his advantage as a preacher i 56

ii 281. 397
he is the reputed author of the acth

it is hostile to truth and virtue 424
Psalm

ü 210

it disorders the soul with unholy dis-
the multitude bad guides in faith ii 28

positions

ib.
in worship

29

the depravity of nature is increased
in morality

by acts of vice

417
in dying

32

it descends from parents to children,
Murrain of the cattle in Holland ii 349

and therefore is a strong argument
Mysteries render a religion doubtful in four

for diligence in education 23
respects
ii 355 Orobio, (Isaac) a learned Jew

i 184
Mysteries of Mahometism, of popery, of pa.
ganism, of infidelity, contrasted with

Р
Christianity

ib. Pagans, their belief in the presence of the

gods at their festivals, largely
N

illustrated

ü 194

their major and their minor myste-
Nations cautioned against placing an altimate

ries too abominable for description
reliance on fleets and armies i 126

358
Nations are regarded as one body, in the visi- Papists, their uncharitableness in denying sal-
tation of the iniquities of our fathers

Pation to all Christians out of their
i 108
communion

i 375
National dangers should especially affect those they cannot be saved as idolaters 376
who are most exposed

387

they are guilty of adoring the host,
Nativity of Christ, all nature rejoicing at his

&c.

ib.
birth

i 149

they are but a novel people, compared
Nature and grace abound with marvels i 93

with the primitive Christians i 28
the study of it unsearchably sublime their preachers censured

96
ii 100 Pardon, promises of it to various classes of
Natural religion, the disciple of it embarrassed

ži 94
on contemplating the miseries of Parents cautioned how to look on their chil-
man, &c. but all these are no diffi-

dren

ü 217
culties to the disciple of revealed Party spirit, the dangers of it

i 44
religion

i 213 Paul, (St.) he kept his body under for the
the disciple of natural religion, is

race and the fight

ü 12
equally embarrassed in studying an eulogium on his character 13
the nature of man in three respects the time of his rapture into the third

214
heaven

ii 200
the disciple of natural, and the disci the transports of his rapture 201

ple of revealed religion, at the tri the obscurity of some parts of his writ-
bunal of God, soliciting pardon 216

ings arise for the want of historic
fortifying themselves against the fear

reference

219
of death

he preached Christ at the tribunals
the confusion of Pagan philosophers,

where he was prosecuted for
respecting natural religion, in four

preaching him

293
respects

218 he selected three subjects of discourse
Nebuchadnezzar, the rapidity of his conquest

before Felix, calculated to convert
i 68
that prince

ib.
Nehemas, (Rabbi) his curious reply to a Ro court preachers contrasted with St.
man Consul, who had inquired con-

Paul, in a striking apostrophe to
cerning the name of God i 328

the dignitaries of the church, who
Nicodemites described

ji 406

surround the person of Louis XIV.
Night, a christian seeking for the evidence of

294
religion, is placed between the night he is a model for preachers 299
of historic difficulties, and the night Passion, a lawless, favourite passion dangerous
of his future hopes

ii 173
to the soul

i 357
the faith which respects the night of

the passions defined

ji 72
futurity

179

they war against the mind 74
Nineveh, the fall of that metropolis 364

and against reason

76
Nobility of birth extravagantly panegyrized the disorders they excite in the ima-

ii 343

gination, exceed those excited in
a virtuous descent, the highest no-

the seasons

75
bility

ib.

erroneous inferences from the pas
sions

ib.
0

remedies of passion described

philosophical advice for subduing
Opinions of the fathers respecting the salva-

them, is to avoid idleness and use
tion of certain heathens i 220

mortification

78

217

severance

zar

Passion, an apostrophe to grace for power | Piety, it is incompatible with the whole de-
over passion

ii 82
sign of religion

88
the illusive happiness acquired by the it renders God's promises to us doubt-
passions

347
ful

ib.
Perfection, the highest attainable in this life, is it is imprudent

ib.
to know death, and not fear it Piety of taste and sentiment defined 384

ii 225 the judgment we form of our state un-
Perseverance, men must be saints before we

der privations

385
exhort them to persevere when privation is general, it indicates

ii 271
an unregenerate state

387
we cannot be saved without per Pilate, the baseness of his conduct i 173
severance

274

his cruelty to the Galileans ii 377
the scripture characters founded Plato, a sketch of his republic

ii 278
their assurance on persevering Plato's opinion of God

i 57
to the end

ib. Plague, an argument for fasting and humilia-
a caveat against unqualified per-

tion

ii 349
275

national plagues sevenfold 352
an address to carnal men, who

appalling horrors of the plague 354
hold this doctrine 276 Pleasure, mischiefs arising from unlawful in-
to visionary men

277
dulgences

i 47. 78
to sincere people

ib. Politeness, as practised by bad men ji 19
models, or examples of perseve Poor, (the) a fine series of arguments in beg-
rance

280
ging for them

i 409
Pentecost, the glories of the day ii 307. i 194 Pope, his kingdom compared with Christ's i 185
Persecution, the agents of it fulfil the pleasure Popery, sketch of its corruptions, pref. i 5. 205
of the Almighty
i 124

(see Papists)
a pathetic contrast between the Poverty, God who quickeneth and arranges all
persecution of the French Pro-

things, often leaves his best servants
testants, and the sufferings of

in indigence and want i 180
the Jews, on the destruction Prayer, a source of consolation ii 152
of their city, by Nebuchadnez- Preachers, the liberty of the French exiles in

ii 365
that respect

ii 84
Petavius, the Semi-Arian, refuted by Bishop Preachers, (the primitive) an admirable ad-
Bull

i 277

vantage in addressing the heathen
Peter, (St.) his confession of faith i 260

and the Jews

i 197
his sermon on the day of Pentecost pos- Predestination, the impossibility of explaining
sessed five excellencies

195

it; but God, who cannot err,
a fine specimen of what he would say,

declares that he offers violence
were he to fill a pulpit

200

to no creature, and that our
his feelings at the transfiguration ii 207

destruction proceeds from our-
his attachment to the Levitical law 219

selves

ii 116
six circumstances aggravate his fall 321 Princes and judges, their qualifications ii 344

the nature of his repentance 323 Principle, purity of principle must be the ba-
Phalaris, his cruelty

i 87
sis of all our conduct

ži 4
Pharisees, their hypocrisy traced ii 36 Prophecy, objections against it answered; its
Philo had a notion of the Trinity i 222

character asserted i 152, &c.
Philosophers, their presumption

i 78

difficulties of affixing a literal
their ancient errors 175

meaning to the prophecies of the
their prejudices against the gos

Messiah and his kingdom i 183
pel unreasonable

206 Prophecies respecting the fall of Jerusalem
Philosophical apathy, a great evil ii 348

ii 149
Piety, its excellence

i 55 Prophecies respecting Christ's death, accom-
it is distinguished by knowledge, since-

plished by his sufferings 169
rity, sacrifice and zeal ii 35, &c. Prophets, how they conducted themselves at
Piety is productive of health

courts

i 399
of reputation

ib. Prophetic eloquence, its superiority i 379
of fortune

39 Professional men, the conditions of their sal-
of happiness

ib.
vation

ii 57
ib. Protestants of France distinguished by their
of confidence in death

ib.

attendance on public worship,
the piety of Ephraim and Judah tran-

and on the days of communion
sient
84

i 16*
so is the piety excited by public calami-

the exiles are exhorted to pray for
ties

ib.

the restoration of their churches
by religious festivals
85

ii 97
by the fear of death

86

the faith of a Protestant 256
transient piety implies a great want of

the abject situation of those who
allegiance to God as a king ib.

remained in France 289
exemplified by Ahab

87

an address to French Protestants
it implies an absurdity of character ib.

368, &c.
it is an action of life perverted by a re-

the care of Providence over them
turn to folly

ib.
in exile

366

38

of peace

men

XV

000 persons

xvi

Proverbs of Solomon, some of them reconciled Reformation, the reformed obtain the free ex-
with his assertions in his Ecclesi-

ercise of religion

ib.
astes

ii 69

the massacre of Paris cruelly
Providence, asserted

i 75

plotted under a marriage with
complaints against it answered

Henry of Navarre ib.
382

Guise attempts to dethrone
complaints against its severity

Henry III. by a league
refuted

383

Henry IV. of Navarre, embraces
the doctrine of Providence should

popery, and ascends the
operate on public bodies of

throno

xii
392
the edict of Nantes

ib.
examples of Providenco over na-

the Jesuits founded by Loyola,
tions

393

no doubt with good intentions,
mysteries of Providence in the

at first, confounded by Riche-
succession of Henry VIIIth of

lieu with the Protestants xii
England, from the Roman Pon.

Louis XIII. persecutes the Pro-
tiff; in the singular success of

testants by Richelieu's advice
Zuinglius; in the courage of

ib.
Luther

ii 102

the final revocation of the edict
Christians often reason ill con-

of Nantes
cerning Providence 338

the horrors and the exile of 800,
six marks of God's mercy and
care of good men, when Jeru-

this persecution

uniformly
salem was destroyed by the

charged on the French clergy;
Chaldeans

368

its impolicy exposed in forty
the same care over the persecut-

arguments

xvii
ed Protestant exiles

ib.

the glory of Louis XIV. waned
Providence has, after one hundred years, an-

from that period

ib.
swered our author's question in Regeneration, character of it

i 315
the affirmative, viz: whether the

(see Holiness)
exile of the Jews and that of

its nature laid down in a
the Protestants, should come to

change of ideas, a change of
a similar close

369

desires, a change of taste, a
Pure (the) all things are pure to them ii 7

change of hopes, a change
Purgatory, unsupported by scripture ji 96

of pursuits

ii 393
Pyrrhonianism

ii 359
its necessity

401
Q

the necessity of regeneration

demonstrated by the genius
Quintus Curtius, his prayer before Carthage

of religion, the wants of man,
i 69

and the perfections of God ib.
R

Religion, progressive in five classes of argu-
ments

ii 13. 16
Rabbins, their extraordinary assumptions over

its evidences were stronger to the
the conscience of the people i 166

scripture characters than to us
Recapitulation of a sermon, fine specimens of it

ii 181
i 342. ii 172. 265 Repentance, some have too much and some
Redemption, the harmony of the divine attri-

too little sorrow for sin i 97
butes in this work, as asserted

possibility of a death bed repent-
Psal. xi. Heb. x. 6. Mic. vi. 6,

ance proved by six arguments
7. 1 Cor. ii. 9
i 96

103
three mysteries of redemption

difficulties of a death bed repent-
not discovered by reason ib.

104
Redemption of the soul

264

character of national repentance
Reformation, the necessity of it
iv

110
the Reformation in France

the penitential reflections of a
Charles VIII. persecuted the

sinner

113
reformed at Rome, and pro- Repentance of a godly sort has sin for its ob-
tected them in Germany vi

ject

306
it very much increased under

it is augmented by reflecting on
Henry II

vii

the number, the enormity, and
the house of Bourbon declare

the fatal influence of sin 307
for the reform, and the house

exhortation to repentance

312
de Guise for the Catholics ib. Repentance described

372. ii 43
the king of Navarre allured by

a powerful exhortation to repent.
new promises, desert the Pro-

51
testant cause

ix

specimen of a death bed repent-
but the queen of Navarre be-

114
comes its most zealous advo-

a series of difficulties attendant
cate

ib.

on a death bed repentance 247
the duke de Guise commences

three objections answered 246
a war with the Protestants,

two prejudices against a protract-
and 50,000 of them are slain x

ed repentance

268

ance

ance

ance

ance

Repentance, a powerful exhortation to repent. | Rome, Christian, her cruelties to the Protes-

269
tants

i 240
Reprobation not absolute; but may be advert subterranean Rome, a book of that
ed

ii 116
title

ii 70
Restitution required

i 363 Romans, the scope of the epistle to them,
so Judas did

ii 114
stated

ii 99
Resurrection of Christ, the evidences of it di-
vided into three classes; presump-

S
tions, proofs, demonstrations

i 187 Sabbath day, punishment threatened for pro-
eight considerations give full

faning it

ji 370
weight to the evidence of the

the difference of the sabbath with re-
apostles

188

gard to the Jews and the Christians
Christ's resurrection demonstrat-

ib.
ed by the gifts conferred on

the origin of the sabbath to demon-
the apostles, and by the same

strate the origin of the world, and
gifts which they conferred on

that God was its creator 371
others

189
to prevent idolatry

ib.
if all these evidences be untrue,

to promote humanity

ib.
all those who wrought mira-

to equalize all men in devotion 372
cles must be taxed with im-

the change of the sabbath from the
posture; all the enemies of

seventh, to the first day of tho
Christianity must be taxed

week

374
with imbecility; and the whole

reasons why the sabbath is binding
multitude which embraced

on the Christian church ib.
Christianity, must be blamed

scandalous profanation of the sabbath
for an extravagance unknown

in Holland

375, &c.
to society

190

an apostrophe to the poor Protestants,
the joy of Christ justified by four

who profane the sabbath in mysti-
considerations

191
cal Babylon

376
presumptions, proofs, demon- Sacrament, a fine invitation to it i 85
strations of it

ii 175

an awful charge not to neglect it
the evidences of Christ's resur-

193
rection has eight distinct cha-

believers invited to it with a view
racters

ib.

of acquiring strength to van-
the faith in testimony worthy of

quish Satan, and to conquer
credit, is distinguished from

death

228
the faith extorted by tyranny

a caution to participate of it with
ib.
sanctity

297
from the faith of the enthusiast

it is often profaned by temporiz-
176

ing communicants ii 85
from the faith of superstition 177

it is a striking obligation to holi-
Resurrection of saints at Christ's death 167

ness

172
the resurrection at his second

a sacramental address 190
coming

336

parallel between the Lord's table,
Revelation has a sufficiency of evidence in re-

and the table of shew bread in
gard to the five classes of unbe-

the temple

193
lievers

i 202

it is polluted by the want of light,
its doctrines lie within the reach

of virtue, and of religious fer-
of the narrowest capacities 203

vour

196
it was gradually conferred accord-

strictures on a precipitate prepa-
ing to the situation and capaci-

ration for it

198
ty of the age

344

addresses of consolation to the de-
Revenge, the purpose of it incompatible with

vout communicant

199
a state of salvation

i 356

God is present at the sacrament
Rhetoric, oriental

i 423
as on mount Sinai

303
Rich man, (the) apparently taxing providence

a striking address to those who
with the inadequacy of former

neglect it

ib.
means, by soliciting a new mean

it is a covenant with God 301, &c.
for the conversion of his brethren

307, &c.
i 201 Sacred writers, their talents, which God
Riches often increase profligacy

ii 19

seems to bave conferred as though
when suddenly acquired they almost

riches and power were too mean
turn a man's brain
346

i 65
Righteous, be not righteous over-much ji 7

their style possessed every beauty ib.
Righteousness, the word explained i 298

they delighted to absorb their soul in
it exalteth a nation 389

the contemplation of God 95
five limits of the expression, Sacred writings, Saurin had an elegant me-
righteousness or religion ex-

thod of quoting from them, as is ap-
alteth a nation

ib.
parent from

ii 146
it promotes every object of difficulties of expounding them 334
civil society

390 | Sacrifices, (see atonement)

to give

Sacrifices, they passed between the parts of

their momentary defects, and their
the victims

ii 306
illustrious virtues

ji 279
Sailors, character of their repentance ü 268 Seal, (see Holy Spirit)

ii 308
Saints, their employment in heaven ii 125 | Self-examination, the method of it ii 186

the sights presented to the saints after Simeon, (Luke ii.) three characters of his piety
death
144

ii 141
they have sighed for immortality and Simeon the Pharisee, four defects in his opi-
a better state of the church 145

nion of Christ

ii 46
their happiness in heaven in regard of Slander, the sinfulness of it

i 386
knowledge

203 Septuagint version, a sketch of its history i 285
of propensity

205 Sinai, its terrors expressive of our Saviour's
of sensible pleasure

206
agony

ii 306
what sentiments the ancient saints en- Sin and its punishment are connected ii 350
tertained of themselves when under the folly of it

i 78
a cloud
274 its effects

84
danger of presumptive thoughts 275 its atrocity when wilful

354
there is a similarity between us and the motives to sin incomparably weaker
the ancient saints in five respects than the motives to virtue

308
281, &c.

little sin conducive of great crimes 367
their high vocation

282

the apology of those who charge sin upon
why the saints are still subject to their constitution, not admissible ii 77
death

340 Sin causes three sorts of tears to be shed 323
Saladin, exposed his shroud to the army the sin or blasphemy against the Holy

i 263
Ghost

328
Sanctification, sin

of opposing it ji 312 the sin unto death, as stated by St. John
(see Regeneration and Holiness)

329
Satan, his victories often ruinous to his king. inquiry concerning this sin may proceed
dom

i 76 from the melancholy, the timorous,
he seeks to seduce us from the truth and the wilful apostates

330
six ways

142 Sinner, hardened and impenitent i 208
he assails the Christian four ways; by Sinners abuse the long-suffering of God, in

the illusive maxims of the world, by the disposition of a devil, a beast,
the pernicious example of the multi-

a philosopher and a man i 111
tude, by threatenings and persecu-

they reason in a reproachful manner
tion, and by the attractions of sensu-

in regard to their love of esteem,
al pleasure

145

and honour, and pleasure, and ab-
his power is borrowed; limited in dura-

horrence of restraint

226
tion, in degree; and whatever desire Sinners are slaves in five respects 269
he may have to destroy us, it cannot they must live to expiate their crimes
equal the desire of God to save us

271

they must glory in Christ alone, but
his design is to render man unlike his

add watchfulness to their future
Maker

332
conduct

i 302
he is the most irregular and miserable Sinners must not be misguided by the multi-
of all beings

370
tude

ii 33
Saturnalia of the Romans, its origin

ii 372 their complaints of the severity of
Saul, the king, his consecration accompanied

God's law, refuted in five argu-
by the spirit

ii 391
ments

i 381
Saurin, his life, born at Nismos, escapes with

their best wisdom is to avoid the ob-
his father to Geneva

i xvii

jects of their passions ii 77
becomos an ensign in Lord Gallo the aggravating characters of their
way's regiment, which then served

sin

122
in Switzerland; but on the peace we should weep for them, because of
with France he returned to his stu-

our connexions with them 124
dies, and preferred the ministry ib. are very great scourges to society 125
preaches five years in London xviii Sinners under the gospel, offend against supe-
character of his preaching ib.

rior light

263
he settles at the Hague

ib.
against superior motives

ib.
is noticed by the Princess of Wales, against the example of scripture cha-
afterward queen Caroline, to whom

racters, who do not continue in sin
his son dedicated his posthumous

till the end of life

264
ib.

against the virtues of those converts ib.
his ministry was attended by princes, and sinners who delay conversion to
magistrates, generals and scientific

the close of life cannot adduce equal
men; his courage in reproving 386

evidence of their conversion 265
Schem, (Rabbi) his contrast between the tem- Smuggling and defrauding the revenue, cen-
ple and the palaces of princes i 193

sured

i 355
Schoolmen, many of their errors proceeded Society cannot subsist without religion, de-

from monastic habits, illustrated monstrated in five arguments i 230
by the doctrine of reprobation the transition of society from simpli-

i 100

city of manners, to a style of living
Scripture characters, the distinction between

injurious to charity

421

227

sermons

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