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Labour first gave right to proper Money due to foreigners cannot al-
ty,

364 ways be paid in goods or bills
Land, the yearly rent of it might of exchange,

17
better be limited than the in- necessity of a proportion of
terest of money,

36, 37
it in trade,

21
the price of it rises not by want of it very injurious to
lowering the interest, 30.-The landholders,

25
cause of this,

37 lowering the value of it in-
rises in proportion to the creaseth not the value of other
number of buyers,
39, 53 things,

30-35
what increases the sellers of it is valued according to the
it,

53 plenty or scarcity of commodi-
what diminishes the number ties,

30, 32, 34, 36,
of its purchasers,

54 mischievous consequences of
the value of it decreases with a scarcity of it, 47-50
the decay of trade, ibid.

want of it at last falls

upon
too much advance of its price land,

73-75
an injury to the public, 62 - how the value of it may be

why men pay taxes for it, said to be raised, 82-86
though mortgaged,

75

it cannot be really raised,
how it came at first to be

ap-

unless in proportion to its plenty
propriated,
360 or scarceness,

82
Landholders, want of trade a great raising in denomination,
loss to them,

25, 54, 56 tends to impoverish a nation,
Laws (human) must not be con-

86
trary to the law of nature or is valued according to the
Scripture,

419, note quantity of silver contained in
Legislative power, how it is bound- it, 89.--How it comes to be
ed,

423 otherwise when clipped, 94
Liberty, how men are by nature in the advantage of it in com-
the state of it,

339 merce above uncoined silver,
wherein it consists, 351

88
restraint by the law of na- the cause of melting it down,
ture consistent with it, 341

90
how far it is given up, by

it is better for the public to
becoming members of a com- be milled than hammered, 91
monwealth,

396, &c.

raising the denomination
Lineal succession, not restored in will not hinder the exportation
the kings of Israel, 337

91, 93
none observed among - the value of it should be kept
the rulers of Israel till David's as steady as possible, 103
time,

334 the proportion should always
Lowndes (Mr.) propounded to have be exactly kept between that of

our money reduced to one-fifth gold and silver, 97, 99
less value,

153 constant equality of its value,
his reasons for lessening the interest of every country, ib.
the value of money, answered, making it lighter than it
ibid.

should be is unjust, 109, &c.

lowering it, no advantage in

selling and letting of land, 112,
Monarchy, how government, at

&c.
first, generally came to be so, why so little is sometimes
400. Vid. Absolute Monarchy. coined,

119

of it,

M.

Money, how it has been altered in

former times, 185,- and the
most probable occasion of it, 187

how to prevent the melting
of it down, or exporting it, 199

how the use of it first en-
larged the extent of property,

365-366
Vid. Interest of Money.

N.

Money, it is really valuable ac-

cording to its weight, 139.-
This must be understood of
silver without the alloy, 140

why so much was coined
in queen Elizabeth's time, and
after,

130
-how it answers all things, 139

the denomination alters not
the intrinsic value, ibid.

lessening its real value is
worse than clipping, 146

its being current only for its
weight, is the most effectual way
to stop the mischief of clipping,

147
it is necessary in proportion to
the plenty of it in neighbouring
nations,

148
it will always be of equal
value with the same weight of
standard silver,

158
what causes the exportation
of it,

160
it ought not to be made
lighter, though silver were
grown dearer,

164
lessening it would be a gain
to money-hoarders, but a loss to

166
by making it one-fifth light-
er, creditors and landlords lose
20 per cent.

168
and labourers also lose by
it, unless they have one-fifth
more wages,

170
the change of its name will
not alter its value,

177
the insignificancy of lessen-
ing, explained by familiar simi-
litudes,

ibid.
if a crown of it (e. g.) be
called 75 pence, it will buy no
more goods than if it be called

180
lowering its value will not
render it more generally use-
ful,

ibid.
it cannot be of the full price
of bullion, because of exporting
the latter,

184
the true raising it is by put-
ting more silver in it, 185

Nature, men are by it in a state
of equality,

340
by it people have liberty,
but not licence,

341
in the state of it, every
one has right to punish the
breach of its law, 341, 342

the inconveniencies of
it not greater than of absolute
monarchy,

345
independent princes are
still in the state of it, 346
Noah had authority given him, in
common with his sons, 235

was not the sole heir of the
world,

238
had a greater dominion over
the creatures than Adam, 239

none of his sons heir to
Adam, more than the rest, 316

others,

P.

60 pence,

Par (in the exchange of money)
what it means,

149
Parental power, perhaps a more fit

phrase than (as usual) paternal
power,

367, 368
- how it differs from poli-
tical,

378
Parents, their power temporary,

but the honour due to them per-
petual,

375
the ground and extent of
their power over their children,

370, &c.
may give masters authority
to use force upon their children,

377

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Patriarch, this name denotes not Property, it was at length settled
having sovereign power from by law,

371
Adam,

315

cannot be rightly taken
Perjury, to be carefully prevented from any, without their con-
by law-inakers,
6 sent,

422
frequent oaths a great oc- Providence, the bounty of it, in
casion of it,

ibid. making the most useful things
Peru, some of the inhabitants fat- commonly the cheapest, 41

tened and eat children, 254
Political power, what it is, 338,

R.
339
though in some cases it is Rebellion, the word sometimes
“absolute,” yet not “ arbitra- used for a lawful war, 473, 474
ry,"

422

the best means to pre-
Political societies, how framed, vent it is good government,
394

ibid.
how they began, 400, &c.

governors may be guilty
- must be determined by the

of it as well as the governed,
majority, unless they agree on a

ibid.
greater number,

395

Rents, the advantage of paying
why we have no historical them quarterly, or weekly, 27
account of their beginning, 397, the causes of their falling,
&c.

69, 70
Power, paternal, political, and Representatives of the people, how
despotical,

440 sometimes very unequal, 432,
Vid. Supreme.

433
Prerogative, wherein it consists,-

corrupting them, or pre-
434, &c.

gaging the electors, tends to
how and why it is some-

dissolve the government, 470
times limited,

437 Resistance of tyranny, when it is
the end of it is the pub- lawful,

476
lic good,

ibid.

when it is lawful to be
who mayjudge concern-

ibid.
ing the right or wrong use of

it is warrantable to use
it,

438 it, for repelling illegal force, 482
if people are injured by
it, they may appeal to Heaven,

s.

used,

439
Price of things not always propor- Sellers, plenty of them makes
tionable to their usefulness, 41 things cheap,

39
of foreign commodities ad- Shem (the patriarch) was no ab-
vances by being taxed, but that solute monarch,

321, &c.
of home ones falls,

58 Silver is ten times more plentiful
the reason of this, ibid. now than two hundred years
Property, how men come to have ago, and why,

47
it,

361, 367 it is therefore nine parts in
how it is naturally bound- ten cheaper,

ibid.
368, &c. properly speaking, none of
in land and other things, at it is finer than other, 140
first acquired by labour, ibid. measures the value of other
how this is a common ad- things,

140, 141
vantage,

364 how standard is in England

ed,

proportioned with alloy, 142, Taxes though laid upon trade

143 in Holland, yet they chiefly
Silver, the advantages of its being impoverish landholders, 60, 61
mixed with copper, in money, ib. Trade is hindered by lowering the
is brought in by an overba-

interest of money,

12
lance of trade, 148, 149 enriches a nation more than
is alone the measure of com- mines do,

ibid.
merce, and not gold, 151, 152 when it is gainful, or a loss
- when it may be said to rise or to a nation,

18
fall in the value of it, 154, 155 -the general decay of it lessens
it is always in value accord- the value of land,

53, &c.
ing to its weight, if standard, what is the overbalance of
156 it,

148
how unreasonable it is to Tyranny, wherein it consists, 457
pretend it to be worth more un-

speech of king James I.
coined, than coined, 171-3 concerning it,

ibid.
whence uncoined sometimes

the greatness of the per-
advances in the price of it, 174 sons exercising it aggravates
Slavery, it is hard to suppose any the crime,

459
one to plead for it in earnest,

212

U.
wherein it consists, 351
Slaves, men are not born such,213, Usurpation, wherein it consists,
&c.

455
the Israelites were not so,
when returned out of Egypt, 329
Jacob's sons

were not
such, as appears by Reuben War, the state of it described,
and Judah,
330

347, &c.
Society, vid. Conjugal and Politi-

he that seeks the life or
cal.

liberty of another, is in a state
Spain is itself poor, though it fur- of it,

ibid.
nishes all other nations with

how it differs from the
gold and silver,
72 state of nature,

348
Supreme power of the common-

avoiding it, the design of
wealth, where it lies, 427 forming society,

350
West Indies, some nations there
T.

have no supreme governor un-
less in time of war,

398, 402
Taxes generally fall at last upon Wheat, more fit than most other
land,

55-7 things for a common measure
increase the price of fo- of trade,

46
reigo, but lessen that of home

it is not so useful for ex-
commodities,

change as money,

47

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59

END OF VOL. V.

LONDON:

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